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Biotech Patents

A Tactical and Practical Guide to Today's Most Complex Issues

Monday, April 07, 2003

About

A Tactical and Practical Guide to Today's Most Complex Issues

The human genome has been mapped and patented. Science now stands on the threshold of deciphering the mysteries of the proteins that manipulate and control gene function. As new and amazing genomic and proteomic discoveries continue to be made, biotech and pharmaceutical companies are seeking to patent the tools and processes which have allowed them and continue to allow them to unlock the secrets of genetic defects and disease in their quest to develop new drugs and therapies. Moreover, based on the number of infringement actions filed this year alone, they are clearly holding no bars to protect the biotech inventions on which they already hold patents.

With millions in future revenue at stake, it is imperative that counsel to biotech and pharmaceutical companies and their advisors have an up-to the minute and complete understanding of the latest legal developments affecting biotech patents. This American Conference Institute conference presented thoughtful and targeted commentary and in-depth analysis from an outstanding faculty of leading in-house biotech and pharmaceutical counsel and expert attorneys. They provided practical, comprehensive information and insights on:
  • Significant case law and actions to watch
  • How pending reforms for pharmaceutical patents may affect biotech patents
  • Strategies for patenting and defending reach-through claims
  • Understanding and mastering the Written Description Guidelines
  • How to draft claims broad enough and specific enough to adequately protect your biotech related inventions
  • The impact of the new standards for utility and enablement on patenting gene and protein function and genomic and proteomic sequences
  • Successful licensing: tips and traps in view of recent developments
  • How to conduct a freedom to operate analysis in the evolving biotech patent landscape
This is by far the most comprehensive program of the year on biotech patents. Take this opportunity to get the information that you need from those on the leading edge of law and science.

Contents & Contributors

About

A Tactical and Practical Guide to Today's Most Complex Issues

The human genome has been mapped and patented. Science now stands on the threshold of deciphering the mysteries of the proteins that manipulate and control gene function. As new and amazing genomic and proteomic discoveries continue to be made, biotech and pharmaceutical companies are seeking to patent the tools and processes which have allowed them and continue to allow them to unlock the secrets of genetic defects and disease in their quest to develop new drugs and therapies. Moreover, based on the number of infringement actions filed this year alone, they are clearly holding no bars to protect the biotech inventions on which they already hold patents.

With millions in future revenue at stake, it is imperative that counsel to biotech and pharmaceutical companies and their advisors have an up-to the minute and complete understanding of the latest legal developments affecting biotech patents. This American Conference Institute conference presented thoughtful and targeted commentary and in-depth analysis from an outstanding faculty of leading in-house biotech and pharmaceutical counsel and expert attorneys. They provided practical, comprehensive information and insights on:
  • Significant case law and actions to watch
  • How pending reforms for pharmaceutical patents may affect biotech patents
  • Strategies for patenting and defending reach-through claims
  • Understanding and mastering the Written Description Guidelines
  • How to draft claims broad enough and specific enough to adequately protect your biotech related inventions
  • The impact of the new standards for utility and enablement on patenting gene and protein function and genomic and proteomic sequences
  • Successful licensing: tips and traps in view of recent developments
  • How to conduct a freedom to operate analysis in the evolving biotech patent landscape
This is by far the most comprehensive program of the year on biotech patents. Take this opportunity to get the information that you need from those on the leading edge of law and science.

Contents & Contributors

THE SCOPE OF PROTECTION UNDER THE "SAFE HARBOR" PROVISION OF THE HATCH-WAXMAN ACT AND THAT OF FOREIGN COUNTERPARTS; APPLICABILITY OF SECTION 271 (e) (1) TO RESEARCH TOOL PATENTS; AND APPLICABILITY OF SECTION 271 (g) TO TECHNICAL DATA
Brian D. Coggio, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe

THE EVOLVING LAW OF CLAIM CONSTRUCTION
Maggie Kanter, Genzyme

SURVEY OF CASE LAW AND PENDING ACTIONS AFFECTING BIOTECH PATENTS
Kathleen Madden Williams, Palmer & Dodge

FESTO IN LIGHT OF THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT'S EN BANC HEARING: WHERE ARE WE NOW?
Alex Chachkes, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, LLP
Scott B. Familant, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, LLP

CURRENT LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVES IMPACTING BIOTECH PATENT RIGHTS
Elizabeth Stotland Weiswasser, Covington & Burling

FOCUS ON RESEARCH TOOLS/METHOD PATENTS
Jane T. Gunnison, Fish & Neave

DEFENSES TO INFRINGEMENT OF RESEARCH TOOL PATENTS UNDER 35 USC 271(e) (1)
Barry S. White, Frommer, Lawrence & Haug

DEFENSES TO INFRINGEMENT OF RESEARCH TOOL PATENTS UNDER 35 U.S.C. 271 (g)
Stephen B. Maebius, Foley & Lardner

RESEARCH TOOL PATENTS: JUDICIAL REMEDIES
Donald R. Ware, Foley, Hoag & Eliot, LLP

THE PROBLEM WITH RESEARCH TOOL PATENTS
Barbara A. Gyure, Palmer & Dodge
Steven B. Kelber, Piper Rudnick

PATENTABILITY OF "REACH-THROUGH" CLAIMS: U.S., EUROPEAN AND JAPANESE PATENT OFFICE PERSPECTIVES
Richard J. Berman, Arent Fox

US TREATMENT OF REACH-THROUGH CLAIMS AND REACH-THROUGH ROYALTIES
Frank P. Grassler, GlaxoSmithKline

THE LAW OF WRITTEN DESCRIPTION IN PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOTECHNOLOGY PATENTS
Joseph M. Manak, Greenberg Traurig LLP

INSULIN, INTERFERON, AND EPO: A DECADE OF WRITTEN DESCRIPTION IN BIOTECHNOLOGY PATENTS
Charles Weiss, Kenyon & Kenyon

BREADTH OF CLAIM ISSUES
Paul M. Booth, Ph.D., Heller Ehrman

BREADTH OF CLAIM ISSUES: HOW BROAD CAN YOU GO?
Seth Fidel, Neurogen Corporation

ENABLEMENT HISTORY AND STATISTICS
Maurice M. Klee, Ph.D., J.D., Attorney at Law

THE CURRENT STATE OF THE ART WITH RESPECT TO THE USPTO'S APPLICATION OF THE "REVISED" UTILITY GUIDELINES
Diana Hamlet-Cox, Ph.D., J.D., Incyte Genomics, Inc.
James E. Hopenfeld, Fish & Neave

GENE HAPLOTYPES APPLICABILITY OF THE UTILITY GUIDELINES
Melodie W. Henderson, Genaissance Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

PROTEOMICS AND GENOMICS: MEETING UTILITY REQUIREMENTS
Kurt E. Richter, Morgan & Finnegan

STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSFULLY LICENSING BIOTECH PATENTS IN VIEW OF RECENT LEGAL DEVELOPMENTS
Stephen Johnson, Kirkland & Ellis

FREEDOM TO OPERATE: KEY CONSIDERATIONS FOR AN EVOLVING LEGAL LANDSCAPE
David J. Earp, J.D., Ph.D., Geron Corporation


DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0