8th National Forum on

Export Controls

Wednesday, April 27, 2005

About

It has been a year of significant movement on the export controls front. As the United States takes a more aggressive approach to enforcement in all areas of international trade regulation and national security, the Departments of State, Commerce, Treasury and Homeland Security are vigorously policing the export activities of U.S. firms and their foreign trading partners to ensure strict compliance with export control and economic sanctions laws.

Rising government expectations and new regulatory standards increase risks for U.S. and foreign companies in our increasingly global business environment. Export controls are becoming ever more complex and restrictive, and U.S. exporters must develop effective internal export control compliance programs that do not unduly hamper legitimate trade. Civil and criminal penalties are rising, cases are high profile and yesterday's knowledge is simply not enough to make the right decisions today.

Get an update on regulatory and policy initiatives from the American Conference Institute's Export Controls publication, and learn how industry is setting up internal controls to comply in this constantly changing global legal landscape. The publication materials will include the latest information on:

  • How to determine whether particular products, technologies or transactions are subject to control
  • The impact of the Lachman case on "specially designed" definition problems
  • How the deemed export rule impacts hiring, recruiting and immigration procedures
  • Key strategies for developing and implementing a successful export compliance program
  • What OFAC's increased compliance expectations mean to your company
  • Managing risks associated with foreign subsidiaries, agents and distributors
  • Risks and benefits of self-disclosures
  • Dual-use items: at what point does your product morph into a controlled item?
  • Contents & Contributors

    About

    It has been a year of significant movement on the export controls front. As the United States takes a more aggressive approach to enforcement in all areas of international trade regulation and national security, the Departments of State, Commerce, Treasury and Homeland Security are vigorously policing the export activities of U.S. firms and their foreign trading partners to ensure strict compliance with export control and economic sanctions laws.

    Rising government expectations and new regulatory standards increase risks for U.S. and foreign companies in our increasingly global business environment. Export controls are becoming ever more complex and restrictive, and U.S. exporters must develop effective internal export control compliance programs that do not unduly hamper legitimate trade. Civil and criminal penalties are rising, cases are high profile and yesterday's knowledge is simply not enough to make the right decisions today.

    Get an update on regulatory and policy initiatives from the American Conference Institute's Export Controls publication, and learn how industry is setting up internal controls to comply in this constantly changing global legal landscape. The publication materials will include the latest information on:

  • How to determine whether particular products, technologies or transactions are subject to control
  • The impact of the Lachman case on "specially designed" definition problems
  • How the deemed export rule impacts hiring, recruiting and immigration procedures
  • Key strategies for developing and implementing a successful export compliance program
  • What OFAC's increased compliance expectations mean to your company
  • Managing risks associated with foreign subsidiaries, agents and distributors
  • Risks and benefits of self-disclosures
  • Dual-use items: at what point does your product morph into a controlled item?
  • Contents & Contributors


    AN INTRODUCTION TO THE BIS EXPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM
    Wendy L. Wysong, U.S. Department of Commerce

    CURRENT TRENDS AND HOT ISSUES IN EXPORT CONTROLS
    William M. McGlone, Miller & Chevalier Chartered

    EXPORT CONTROL ISSUES IN MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS
    Thomas McVey, Williams Mullen Clark & Dobbins

    INTERPRETING REGULATORY DEFINITIONS IMPACT OF THE LACHMAN CASE
    Marynell DeVaughn, Raytheon Company

    ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DEEMED EXPORT PROGRAM
    Renée Skonier, Cisco Systems
    Jim Wyatt, Motorola, Inc.
    Richard J. Pettler, Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen & Loewy, LLP

    DUAL USE: WHEN DOES YOUR DUAL USE PRODUCT MORPH INTO A DEFENSE ARTICLE?
    Michael Deal, Attorney at Law

    EXPORT COMPLIANCE TOOLS AND PROCESS CONTROLS
    Laura K. Kennedy, Honeywell International Inc.

    COMPLYING WITH ITAR CONTROLS: PRACTICAL ADVICE LATEST DEVELOPMENTS
    Philip S. Rhoads, Attorney at Law

    ACI 8TH NATIONAL FORUM ON EXPORT CONTROLS
    Ramona Hazera, The Boeing Company

    IMPLEMENTING AN EXPORT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM: KEY MECHANISMS TO COMPLY IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY
    Gary L. Hallen, Eastman Chemical Company

    GLOBAL EXPORT COMPLIANCE
    Kathleen Lockard Palma, General Electric Company

    GLOBAL EXPORT COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS
    Lori A. Manca, Invitrogen Corporation

    IMPLEMENTING AN EXPORT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM
    Shannon Poskevich, Schlumberger Ltd.

    OFAC COMPLIANCE STRATEGIES
    John Pisa-Relli, U.S. Department of the Treasury

    A FOCUS ON OFAC
    Thomas E. Crocker, Alston & Bird LLP

    COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR RESEARCH DOLLAR WHILE AVOIDING THE PITFALLS OF U.S. EXPORT CONTROLS
    William L. Clements, Foley & Lardner

    VOLUNTARY DISCLOSURES: WEIGHING THE RISKS AND BENEFITS
    F. Amanda DeBusk, Miller & Chevalier Chartered

    COMPLIANCE WITH U.S. ENCRYPTION EXPORT CONTROLS
    Ben H. Flowe, Jr., Berliner, Corcoran & Rowe, LLP

    MANAGING YOUR COMPANY'S EXPOSURE STEMMING FROM THIRD PARTY RELATIONSHIPS
    Mark C. Joye, Baker & Hostetler LLP

    THE EXTRATERRITORIAL REACH OF U.S. EXPORT CONTROLS
    James Bartlett III, Northrop Grumman Corporation
    Nicholas F. Coward, Baker & McKenzie
    Glenn A. Cranker, Stikeman Elliott

    CANADA'S FOREIGN TERRITORIAL MEASURES ACT: BLOCKING THE APPLICATION OF U.S. TRADE SANCTIONS AGAINST CUBA WITHIN CANADA
    Glenn A. Cranker, Stikeman Elliott

    SPECIFIC REGULATORY ISSUES
    Marynell DeVaughn, Raytheon Company



    DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0