The Advanced Business and Operations Guide to Preventing, Detecting And Responding To

Security Breaches and Identity Theft

Make sure you're not next...

Thursday, September 15, 2005

About

Identity theft cost financial institutions over 60 billion dollars last year...
Do you have the operational and strategic tools you need to prevent, detect and respond to the growing threat of security breaches and identity theft?

With ever-more sophisticated hackers and cyber-criminals, the topic of identity theft has come up more and more frequently as the number one issue facing financial institutions, and for good reason. The statistics showing financial and reputational damage from security breaches and resulting identity theft are staggering.

  • A recent well-publicized security breach resulted in the theft of over 300,000 people's names, addresses, Social Security and driver license numbers
  • More than 180,000 customers of a large retail clothing store had their names and credit card numbers stolen due to a security breach on the store's data bank
  • Phishing e-mail messages intercepted by a web security company grew 300% since June 2004, spam e-mail traffic by 77%, and serious software vulnerabilities grew by 13%

In this environment, it is not enough to simply have in place an information security plan; the CIO, CTO, Risk Managers, Privacy Officers and Counsel must operate cohesively and quickly to stay ahead of fraudsters with a top-notch system that will ensure, enforce and audit the security of customer data.

American Conference Institute's publication on Detecting and Responding to Security Breaches and Identity Theft will give financial institution executives tested, real-life practical strategies for protecting the security of customer information data before there is a breach.

The publication will provide you with valuable information on the most pressing issues.

Contents & Contributors

About

Identity theft cost financial institutions over 60 billion dollars last year...
Do you have the operational and strategic tools you need to prevent, detect and respond to the growing threat of security breaches and identity theft?

With ever-more sophisticated hackers and cyber-criminals, the topic of identity theft has come up more and more frequently as the number one issue facing financial institutions, and for good reason. The statistics showing financial and reputational damage from security breaches and resulting identity theft are staggering.

  • A recent well-publicized security breach resulted in the theft of over 300,000 people's names, addresses, Social Security and driver license numbers
  • More than 180,000 customers of a large retail clothing store had their names and credit card numbers stolen due to a security breach on the store's data bank
  • Phishing e-mail messages intercepted by a web security company grew 300% since June 2004, spam e-mail traffic by 77%, and serious software vulnerabilities grew by 13%

In this environment, it is not enough to simply have in place an information security plan; the CIO, CTO, Risk Managers, Privacy Officers and Counsel must operate cohesively and quickly to stay ahead of fraudsters with a top-notch system that will ensure, enforce and audit the security of customer data.

American Conference Institute's publication on Detecting and Responding to Security Breaches and Identity Theft will give financial institution executives tested, real-life practical strategies for protecting the security of customer information data before there is a breach.

The publication will provide you with valuable information on the most pressing issues.

Contents & Contributors


EFFECTIVE IDENTIFICATION, EFFICIENT RETRIEVAL
Robert D. Moody, Grant Thornton LLP

CASE STUDY: ACXIOM CORPORATION
Tim Spainhour, Acxiom Corporation

UPGRADING YOUR INFORMATION SECURITY TO MEET OPERATIONAL AND REGULATORY STANDARDS
C. Warren Axelrod, Pershing LLC

PRIVACY REGULATIONS NEW RISKS, NEW REQUIREMENTS
Michael J. Brauneis, Protiviti, Inc.

THE NEW LAW OF INFORMATION SECURITY: WHAT COMPANIES NEED TO DO NOW
Thomas J. Smedinghoff, Baker & McKenzie LLP

CREATING A COMPREHENSIVE FRAUD MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
Tim Keller, TransUnion

SECURITY BREACH LESSONS LEARNED IN CALIFORNIA
Joanne McNabb, California Department of Consumer Affairs

DATA PROTECTION LEGISLATION MOVES FORWARD IN THE SENATE
Behnam Dayanim, Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker LLP
Vance Schuemann, Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker LLP

STATE INFORMATION COMPROMISE NOTIFICATION LAWS
Peter L. McCorkell, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.

MINIMIZING REPUTATIONAL RISK WHEN A SECURITY BREACH OCCURS
Chris Gidez, Hill and Knowlton

WHAT TO DO IF COMPROMISED
Christine Frye, Countrywide Financial Corporation
Joseph Majka, Visa U.S.A., Inc.
Peter McCorkell, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
Marc Loewenthal, New Century Mortgage

ENSURING SECURE AND COMPLIANT PROCESSES WHEN USING THIRD PARTIES AND CONSULTANTS
John Delaney, Morrison & Foerster LLP

ENSURING SECURE AND COMPLIANT PROCESSES WHEN USING THIRD PARTIES AND CONSULTANTS
Brian Hengesbaugh, Baker & McKenzie LLP



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0