International Forum on

China Trade Compliance

Wednesday, February 15, 2006

About

Can your company afford border delays and being the target of an enforcement action in China?

As U.S. exports to China continue to increase, U.S. companies willing to succeed in the People's Republic of China face unique and complex tax and customs regulations.

The PRC is extending trading and distribution rights to foreign companies and now allows the establishment of a Foreign Invested Commercial Enterprise (FICE) that permits foreign companies to import and distribute goods to customers throughout China. U.S. companies have a greater opportunity than ever before to enter the marketplace in China but must be able successfully navigate the Chinese regulatory environment associated with importing into or exporting from mainland China to make sure their customs operations are compliant. Keeping track of recent changes in China's customs laws is complex and local administrative bodies and regional customs offices have a lot of leeway interpreting the law. Civil and criminal penalties are rising, cases are high profile and yesterday's knowledge is simply not enough to make the right decisions today.

At home, the political pressure to toughen the enforcement of U.S. export controls for transactions to China has never been greater than under the current Administration. The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) is preparing a regulation that could impose broad controls on exports to China. The expected rules could require exporters of goods that wouldn't normally require a license to apply for a license, and many products, softwares and technologies could become subject to the proposed expanded export controls on China. How should your company prepare for this new "catch-all" regulation?

Contents & Contributors

About

Can your company afford border delays and being the target of an enforcement action in China?

As U.S. exports to China continue to increase, U.S. companies willing to succeed in the People's Republic of China face unique and complex tax and customs regulations.

The PRC is extending trading and distribution rights to foreign companies and now allows the establishment of a Foreign Invested Commercial Enterprise (FICE) that permits foreign companies to import and distribute goods to customers throughout China. U.S. companies have a greater opportunity than ever before to enter the marketplace in China but must be able successfully navigate the Chinese regulatory environment associated with importing into or exporting from mainland China to make sure their customs operations are compliant. Keeping track of recent changes in China's customs laws is complex and local administrative bodies and regional customs offices have a lot of leeway interpreting the law. Civil and criminal penalties are rising, cases are high profile and yesterday's knowledge is simply not enough to make the right decisions today.

At home, the political pressure to toughen the enforcement of U.S. export controls for transactions to China has never been greater than under the current Administration. The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) is preparing a regulation that could impose broad controls on exports to China. The expected rules could require exporters of goods that wouldn't normally require a license to apply for a license, and many products, softwares and technologies could become subject to the proposed expanded export controls on China. How should your company prepare for this new "catch-all" regulation?

Contents & Contributors


EXPORT CONTROLS AND THE NEW "CATCH-ALL" REGULATION: A DECENT INTO AN EXPORTER HELL
John R. Liebman, McKenna Long & Aldridge, LLP

END USE CONTROLS AND THE NEW CHINA "CATCH ALL" RULE
Christopher R. Wall, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman

CUSTOMER SCREENING: EXPORT COMPLIANCE CHALLENGES, TRANSPARENCY AND THE PRC
Valerie Vorres, Cisco Systems

IMPLEMENTING AN INTERNAL CONTROL PLAN (ICP) FOR YOUR CHINESE OPERATIONS AND CLIENTS
Nancy Zhao, Texas Instruments

DUEL-USE TRADE WITH CHINA: A DELICATE BALANCING ACT
Bernard Kritzer, Bureau of Industry and Security, U.S. Department of Commerce

EXPORT ENFORCEMENT PRIORITIES IN CHINA AND THE U.S.
Mark D. Menefee, Baker & McKenzie

THE IMPORT ENVIRONMENT IN CHINA: HOW THE LATEST DEVELOPMENTS WILL IMPACT YOUR OPERATIONS
Matthew McConkey, DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary

EXPEDITING CUSTOMS CLEARANCE IN CHINA: WHY & HOW INTERPRETATION OF CUSTOMS RULES MAY DIFFER BETWEEN PORT
Peter M. Zubrin, General Motors Corporation

SPEED UP CUSTOMS CLEARANCE & QUICKLY ADAPT TO THE CHANGING ENVIRONMENT
April Zhai Kun, Hewlett-Packard Company

IMPLEMENTING A SUCCESSFUL TRADE COMPLIANCE PROGRAM IN CHINA
Mary Gill, Flextronics
Erin L. Crockett, Dresser Inc.
Dilip Keswani, Mattel, Inc.
Paul Vandevert, Ford Motor Company

SUPPLY CHAIN OPTIMIZATION VIA FTZ AND WBLP
Linda He, Agilent Technologies

OPTIMIZING CUSTOMS BONDED OPERATIONS TO SUPPORT YOUR CHINA BUSINESS STRATEGY
Jiwei Ye, JPMorgan Chase Vastera

ADDRESSING CUSTOMS ISSUES DIRECTLY WITH GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS
Carol Fuchs, Tyco International (US) Inc.

CHALLENGING CUSTOMS VALUATION DECISION IN CHINA AND RESOLVING DISPUTE
Zhaokang Jiang, Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg, P.A.

ENSURING PROPER CLASSIFICATION IN CHINA
John Robinson, PricewaterhouseCoopers

ESTABLISHING A CUSTOMS EFFICIENT SUPPLY CHAIN
Robert Smith, Ernst &Young (Shanghai, China)

UNDERSTANDING CUSTOMS COMPLIANCE IN CHINA: A COMPLETE GUIDE FOR U.S. COMPLIANCE EXECUTIVES
Xie Xiaoming, DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary
Matthew McConkey, DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary



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