E-Discovery Preparedness For Pharma

Building teams, controlling costs, and developing compliant retention strategies

Monday, March 27, 2006

About

Be Prepared To Tackle Drug Litigation's E-Discovery Demands

As counsel for a pharmaceutical company, you know that the volume of information your client collects electronically presents you with increasing e-discovery concerns. Clinical trials alone generate reams of e-documents, most of which are potentially discoverable in the event of litigation. E-mail is now the preferred means by which sales representatives communicate with doctors, and they often do so in a perfunctory manner that can lead to a discovery nightmare. Additionally, most companies' historical data storage systems are inadequate because their databases were not designed in anticipation of litigation. They are not readily searchable and, in most cases, obsolete.

You must spearhead a company-wide collaborative effort to achieve solid document creation, management, and retention practices, which is made all the more difficult by developments in recent case law, the changing Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and the FDA regulatory structure. If your policies, procedures, and practices aren't effective, your client faces major settlements, damage awards, and even sanctions.

With the unrelenting litigation climate the pharmaceutical industry faces, American Conference Institute has developed the E-Discovery Preparedness for Pharma publication to address the growing needs of an industry that produces millions of proprietary and confidential documents on a daily basis. Top in-house counsel, litigators, and document management and IT professionals will provide you with expert strategies and practical knowledge on:
  • Avoiding common problems that arise out of poor document retention policies
  • Ensuring that e-discovery practices will protect confidential information
  • Searching data in a concise and cost-effective manner
  • Keeping your entire company, particularly your IT staff, on board with preservation compliance policies

Contents & Contributors

About

Be Prepared To Tackle Drug Litigation's E-Discovery Demands

As counsel for a pharmaceutical company, you know that the volume of information your client collects electronically presents you with increasing e-discovery concerns. Clinical trials alone generate reams of e-documents, most of which are potentially discoverable in the event of litigation. E-mail is now the preferred means by which sales representatives communicate with doctors, and they often do so in a perfunctory manner that can lead to a discovery nightmare. Additionally, most companies' historical data storage systems are inadequate because their databases were not designed in anticipation of litigation. They are not readily searchable and, in most cases, obsolete.

You must spearhead a company-wide collaborative effort to achieve solid document creation, management, and retention practices, which is made all the more difficult by developments in recent case law, the changing Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and the FDA regulatory structure. If your policies, procedures, and practices aren't effective, your client faces major settlements, damage awards, and even sanctions.

With the unrelenting litigation climate the pharmaceutical industry faces, American Conference Institute has developed the E-Discovery Preparedness for Pharma publication to address the growing needs of an industry that produces millions of proprietary and confidential documents on a daily basis. Top in-house counsel, litigators, and document management and IT professionals will provide you with expert strategies and practical knowledge on:
  • Avoiding common problems that arise out of poor document retention policies
  • Ensuring that e-discovery practices will protect confidential information
  • Searching data in a concise and cost-effective manner
  • Keeping your entire company, particularly your IT staff, on board with preservation compliance policies

Contents & Contributors


OVERCOMING COMMON E-DISCOVERY PITFALLS
Andrea M. Roberts, Maker & Danliels LLP
Hal S. Shaftel, Proskauer Rose LLP
Sheila A. Denton, Boehringer

MANAGING THE DOCUMENT PRODUCTION PROCESS DURING LITIGATION
Mary Mack, Fios Inc.
Jayson Dukes, FTI Consulting
Peter Boyer, McCarter English
Amy Freestone, Gaegre & Benson LLP
Benjamin R. Barnett, Dechert LLP

ENSURING YOUR DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTION POLICIES PROTECT THE COMPANY'S INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND TRADE SECRETS
Lee A. Goldberg, Brown Raysman Millstein Felder & Steiner LLP
Derek J. Craig, Brown Raysman Millstein Felder & Steiner LLP

PROTECTING INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND TRADE SECRETS IN PHARMACEUTICAL LITIGATION
Richard K. Dandrea, Eckert Seamans
Anna E. Bomstein, Eckert Seamans

RECORDS MANAGEMENT AND BEST PRACTICES IN E-DISCOVERY
Terry O. Tottenham, Fulbright & Jaworski LLP
Charlene A. BrownLee, Senior Counsel, Fulbright & Jaworski LLP

MINIMIZING THE COSTS OF E-DISCOVERY AND DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT
Joe Looby, FTI Consulting, Inc.

COMPLYING WITH ELECTRONIC DISCOVERY OBLIGATIONS, CONTAINING COSTS AND AVOIDING SANCTIONS
Diane S. Barrasso, Barrasso Consulting

E-DISCOVERY PREPARENDESS FOR PHARMA
Jennifer Mendelsohn, Hudson Legal

NEW YORK STATE TO THE LONE STAR STATE: ZUBULAKE IN OPERATION
Andrea M. Johnson, Powers & Frost, LLP

STANDARDIZING THE RECORDATION AND PRODUCTION OF CLINICAL TRIAL DATA
Debra M. Perry, McCarter & English
Roxanne Wilson, Reed Smith



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0