Creditors' Summit on

Consumer Bankruptcy Reform

Strategies for Implementing New Policies and Procedures to Increase Recovery

Wednesday, January 25, 2006

About

Do You Have the Tools You Need to Capitalize on the New Provisions and Enhance Your Bottom Line?

While sought after and heralded by the consumer lending community, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 is unprecedented in the complications it presents to standard practices. Not only does the Act impede the ability of debtors to avoid repayment; it has an equally significant impact on creditors.

Sweeping reforms to discharges, document production periods, credit counseling, automatic stay requirements, reaffirmations and more will require consumer lenders to completely revisit policies and procedures. And given the baffling language and sure-to-come challenges to the new Act, all legal, compliance and collections professionals need to get up to speed on the myriad and complex ramifications of the legislation.

This publication will give you practical, in-depth guidance on revising your policies and procedures to capitalize on the new provisions to ensure increased recoveries.

An outstanding faculty of credit collection executives, professors, and consumer bankruptcy experts provide you with invaluable information and insights on:*
  • NAVIGATING the conflicts between federal and state guidelines and the new provisions
  • CONNECTING with the debtor to avert bankruptcy
  • IMPACTING valuation by working with credit and redemption counselors
  • UNDERSTANDING how trustees will administer the means test
  • INTERPRETING inconsistencies to avoid future litigation
  • SOLUTIONS for maximizing recoveries
  • IMPLEMENTING a policy for notice provision drafting


*American Conference Institute cannot guarantee that every presentation will be included in the publication.

Contents & Contributors

About

Do You Have the Tools You Need to Capitalize on the New Provisions and Enhance Your Bottom Line?

While sought after and heralded by the consumer lending community, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 is unprecedented in the complications it presents to standard practices. Not only does the Act impede the ability of debtors to avoid repayment; it has an equally significant impact on creditors.

Sweeping reforms to discharges, document production periods, credit counseling, automatic stay requirements, reaffirmations and more will require consumer lenders to completely revisit policies and procedures. And given the baffling language and sure-to-come challenges to the new Act, all legal, compliance and collections professionals need to get up to speed on the myriad and complex ramifications of the legislation.

This publication will give you practical, in-depth guidance on revising your policies and procedures to capitalize on the new provisions to ensure increased recoveries.

An outstanding faculty of credit collection executives, professors, and consumer bankruptcy experts provide you with invaluable information and insights on:*
  • NAVIGATING the conflicts between federal and state guidelines and the new provisions
  • CONNECTING with the debtor to avert bankruptcy
  • IMPACTING valuation by working with credit and redemption counselors
  • UNDERSTANDING how trustees will administer the means test
  • INTERPRETING inconsistencies to avoid future litigation
  • SOLUTIONS for maximizing recoveries
  • IMPLEMENTING a policy for notice provision drafting


*American Conference Institute cannot guarantee that every presentation will be included in the publication.

Contents & Contributors


BAPCPA: SOME CHANGES WROUGHT BY THE 2005 AMENDMENTS
Ronald Peterson, Jenner & Block, LLP
David Allard, Allard & Fish P.C.

USING "EDUCATE THE CUSTOMER" PROCEDURES TO DECREASE DEFAULTS
Deborah S. Davis, JPMorgan Chase, N.A.

A FEW BASIC REQUIREMENTS OF THE CREDIT COUNSELING MANDATE
Deanne Loonin, National Consumer Law Center

REDEFINING THE CREDITOR TRUSTEE RELATIONSHIP
Peter C. Fessenden, Chapter 13 Trustee, Maine

OVERVIEW OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGES TO THE BANKRUPTCY CODE BY BANKRUPTCY ABUSE PREVENTION AND CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT
The Honorable William Houston Brown, United States Bankruptcy
Court, Western District of Tennessee
The Honorable David W. Houston, United States Bankruptcy Court,
Northern District of Mississippi

INTERPRETING THE ACT'S AMBIGUITIES TO MINIMIZE RISKS OF FUTURE LITIGATION
Cindy M. Johnson, LLC., Johnson & Newby

RECOVERY STRATEGIES FOR MAXIMIZING BANKRUPTCY COLLECTIONS
Raymond P. Bell Jr., Creditors Interchange

COLLECTION STRATEGIES FOR MORTGAGE SERVICERS AND THE INTERSECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY CODE WITH OTHER FEDERAL LAWS: PITFALLS AND ADVANTAGES FOR THE WARY SERVICER
Jeffrey T. Kucera, Kirkpatrick & Lockhart LLP



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0