2nd National Forum on

Export Enforcement & Investigations

Tuesday, December 05, 2006

About

Higher Penalties for Export Violations and a More Aggressive Enforcement Climate… Is Your Export Compliance Program Current and Effective?

Export enforcement is becoming more aggressive in all stages and following the March 9, 2006 reauthorization of the USA Patriot Act and the fivefold increase in penalties and extended prison terms under the IEEPA, the stakes for companies facing export enforcement actions have increased dramatically. Companies engaging in international business must be vigilant about preventing, detecting and investigating potential export control violations before they damage corporate reputations, affect the bottom line and shareholder value, and result in criminal convictions, prison terms and millions of dollars in civil and criminal penalties.

The publication from the American Conference Institute "National Forum on Export Enforcement and Investigations" is a collection of presentations from an exceptional faculty of top business, legal and government officials who will provide you with practical information on how to defend your case and mitigate export control violations. Highlights from the publication include:

  • How to defend against a deemed export civil penalty proceeding or criminal prosecution
  • Preventing organizational cultures of non-compliance: symptoms and solutions
  • How government evaluates voluntary disclosures
  • Deciding when to investigate employees

Contents & Contributors

About

Higher Penalties for Export Violations and a More Aggressive Enforcement Climate… Is Your Export Compliance Program Current and Effective?

Export enforcement is becoming more aggressive in all stages and following the March 9, 2006 reauthorization of the USA Patriot Act and the fivefold increase in penalties and extended prison terms under the IEEPA, the stakes for companies facing export enforcement actions have increased dramatically. Companies engaging in international business must be vigilant about preventing, detecting and investigating potential export control violations before they damage corporate reputations, affect the bottom line and shareholder value, and result in criminal convictions, prison terms and millions of dollars in civil and criminal penalties.

The publication from the American Conference Institute "National Forum on Export Enforcement and Investigations" is a collection of presentations from an exceptional faculty of top business, legal and government officials who will provide you with practical information on how to defend your case and mitigate export control violations. Highlights from the publication include:

  • How to defend against a deemed export civil penalty proceeding or criminal prosecution
  • Preventing organizational cultures of non-compliance: symptoms and solutions
  • How government evaluates voluntary disclosures
  • Deciding when to investigate employees

Contents & Contributors


BIS EXPORT ENFORCEMENT
Michael D. Turner, Office of Export Enforcement, Bureau of Industry and Security, U.S. Department of Commerce (Washington, DC)

IMPLICATIONS OF "QRS-11" CASES
Kevin Wolf, Bryan Cave LLP (Washington, DC)

KNOWLEDGE AND INTENT: THE PROSECUTORS' PERSPECTIVE ON WHAT THE GOVERNMENT NEEDS TO PROVE AT TRIAL
Mary Carter Andrues, Public Corruption & Civil Rights Section, U.S. Attorney's Office Central - District of California (Los Angeles, CA)
Robert Webster, United States Attorney's Office NorthernDistrict of Texas (Dallas, TX)

EMPOWERED OFFICIALS AT EATON: A LAYERED APPROACH
Timothy E. Boyle, Eaton Corporation (Cleveland, OH)

ROLE OF THE EMPOWERED OFFICIAL
Beth Mersch, ES Export Policy, Procedures and Strategic Planning, Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems (Linthicum, MD)

DEEMED EXPORT ENFORCEMENT
Andrew Irwin, Steptoe & Johnson LLP (Washington, DC)

EXPORT CONTROLS POST-BOOKER: SENTENCING AND PENALTY MITIGATION
Thaddeus R. McBride, Fulbright & Jaworski, LLP (Washington, DC)

EXPORT ENFORCEMENT: NEGOTIATING A CIVIL SETTLEMENT
Carol Fuchs, Tyco International (US) Inc. (Washington, DC)

EXPORT ENFORCEMENT: NEGOTIATING A CIVIL SETTLEMENT
Mark Menefee, Baker & McKenzie (Washington, DC)

DEALING WITH BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND MANAGEMENT
Erin L. Crockett, Global Trade Compliance, Dresser Inc. (Addison, TX)

ACROSS THE ATLANTIC: MANAGEMENT AND EXPORT INVESTIGATIONS AND PROCEEDINGS
Patrick J. Donovan, Airbus S.A.S. (Blagnac, France)

EXPORT INVESTIGATIONS: MANAGING CONFLICTS OF INTEREST AMONG THE BOARD, MANAGEMENT AND INDIVIDUALS
William M. Sullivan, Jr., Winston & Strawn (Washington DC)

PREVENTING ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURES OF NON-COMPLIANCE: SYMPTOMS AND SOLUTIONS
Dave Bowman, Global Trade Compliance, Bell Helicopter Textron Inc.(Fort Worth, TX)
John P. Priecko, Global Trade Compliance, JPMorgan Chase Vastera (Dulles, VA)

VOLUNTARY SELF-DISCLOSURES
Wendy Wysong, Bureau of Industry and Security, U.S. Department of Commerce (Washington, DC)

CONDUCTING A CORPORATE INTERNAL INVESTIGATION INVOLVING EMPLOYEE MISCONDUCT
Heather C. Sears, US Compliance & Security, Cobham (Arlington, VA)



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0