Pharma and Biotech
Industry-Academia
Tech Transfer

Bridge the Gap Between Discovery and Commercialization

Tuesday, February 06, 2007

About

Cross the Cultural Divide

As pharmaceutical and biotech industries look to institutional researchers for the competitive edge in R&D acceleration, they face a culture clash. Plus, there's a continuing struggle to get promising early scientific results developed to the point where industry wishes to take over projects. These challenges can prevent agreements from being reached, cause development pipelines to shrink, and let important university innovations go unnoticed. The end result is diminished efficiency and profitability, putting you at a severe competitive disadvantage.

Reach Mutual Goals Through Sponsored Research and Licensing

Considering these stakes, everyone involved with industry–academia collaborations – whether licensing pharmaceutical biotechnology or sponsored research agreements – must have an in-depth, up-to-the minute understanding of the intricate legal issues needed to bridge the gap between innovation and commercialization.

Reap Mutual Benefits in the Commercialization of Co-Developed IP

The publication from theAmerican Conference Institute's forum on Pharma and Biotech Industry-Academia Tech Transfer is designed to provide you with an intensive and thorough review of the critical legal issues that arise in virtually all industry–academia collaborations. Have access to the presentations of the distinguished faculty of leading experts from research institutions and the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries which will provide insights on how to:

  • Solve IP ownership problems that confront every industry-university collaboration
  • Valuation of early stage IP: The management of uncertainty
  • Assess the impact of NIH Guidelines and Bayh-Dole requirements on licensing, valuation, and funding
  • General and specific issues to consider from the start when developing agreements
  • Define informed consent in the context of the collaborative relationship

Contents & Contributors

About

Cross the Cultural Divide

As pharmaceutical and biotech industries look to institutional researchers for the competitive edge in R&D acceleration, they face a culture clash. Plus, there's a continuing struggle to get promising early scientific results developed to the point where industry wishes to take over projects. These challenges can prevent agreements from being reached, cause development pipelines to shrink, and let important university innovations go unnoticed. The end result is diminished efficiency and profitability, putting you at a severe competitive disadvantage.

Reach Mutual Goals Through Sponsored Research and Licensing

Considering these stakes, everyone involved with industry–academia collaborations – whether licensing pharmaceutical biotechnology or sponsored research agreements – must have an in-depth, up-to-the minute understanding of the intricate legal issues needed to bridge the gap between innovation and commercialization.

Reap Mutual Benefits in the Commercialization of Co-Developed IP

The publication from theAmerican Conference Institute's forum on Pharma and Biotech Industry-Academia Tech Transfer is designed to provide you with an intensive and thorough review of the critical legal issues that arise in virtually all industry–academia collaborations. Have access to the presentations of the distinguished faculty of leading experts from research institutions and the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries which will provide insights on how to:

  • Solve IP ownership problems that confront every industry-university collaboration
  • Valuation of early stage IP: The management of uncertainty
  • Assess the impact of NIH Guidelines and Bayh-Dole requirements on licensing, valuation, and funding
  • General and specific issues to consider from the start when developing agreements
  • Define informed consent in the context of the collaborative relationship

Contents & Contributors


TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH: FRAMING THE CHALLENGE FROM THE OUTSET
O. Prem Das, Praecis Pharmaceuticals Incorporated (Waltham, MA)

TWO POINTS ABOUT TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH: FRAMING THE CHALLENGE FROM THE OUTSET
Scot G. Hamilton, Columbia University (New York, NY)

UNIVERSITIES ARE FROM MARS AND COMPANIES ARE FROM VENUS – MARS UNLEASHED
Mary Dicig, Esq., University of Illinois at Chicago (Chicago, IL)

UNIVERSITIES ARE FROM MARS AND COMPANIES ARE FROM VENUS – OVERCOMING CULTURE CLASH VENUS REPLYING
Tod R. Fairbanks, Ph.D., Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (Princeton, NJ)

VALUATION OF EARLY STAGE IP: THE MANAGEMENT OF UNCERTAINTY
Terry J. Fetterhoff, Roche Diagnostics (Pleasanton, CA)

VALUATION OF EARLY STAGE IP: A PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE
Hong Peng, Ph.D., MBA, Yale University School of Medicine (New Haven, CT)

PHARMA AND BIOTECH INDUSTRY – ACADEMIA TECH TRANSFER: BRIDGE THE GAP BETWEEN DISCOVERY AND COMERCIALIZATION
Sandra Kuzmich, Ph.D., Frommer Lawrence & Haug LLP (New York, NY)

PRODUCTS, PARTNERSHIPS AND PUBLIC INTERESTS: "DOING BUSINESS" WITH THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
Steven M. Ferguson, National Institutes of Health (Rockville, MD)

ASSESSING THE STATE OF AND USE OF GOVERNMENT FUNDED IP ON TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH
Kathleen K. Sybert, Ph.D., Esq., Clinical Technology Transfer Group, P.L.L.C. (McLean, VA)

DIVIDING IP OWNERSHIP IN INDUSTRY-RESEARCH INSTITUTION COLLABORATIONS
Christopher D. Unsworth, Ph.D., Bayer Pharmaceuticals Corporation (West Haven, CT)

DIVIDING IP OWNERSHIP BETWEEN UNIVERSITY AND INDUSTRY – UNIVERSITY'S VIEW
M. Guven Yalcintas, Ph.D.,The Research Foundation of the State University of New York (Albany, NY)

DIVIDING IP OWNERSHIP IN INDUSTRY-RESEARCH INSTITUTION COLLABORATIONS
Christopher F. Wright, Esq., McCausland, Keen & Buckman (Radnor, PA)

TIPS, TRAPS, AND TECHNIQUES ON INFORMED CONSENT IN SPONSORED CLINICAL TRIALS
Peter Leonardi, Ph.D., MBA, The NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center (New York, NY)

INFORMED CONSENT IN RESEARCH COLLABORATIONS
Kate Duffy Mazan, Esq., Clinical Technology Transfer Group, P.L.L.C (McLean, VA)

GENERAL AND SPECIFIC ISSUES TO CONSIDER FROM THE START WHEN DEVELOPING AGREEMENTS
Abram M. Goldfinger, New York University (New York, NY)
Reid J. Leonard, Ph.D., Merck Research Laboratories (Boston, MA)

RESOLVING CONFLICTS OF INTEREST IN INDUSTRY-UNIVERSITY COLLABORATIONS
Gail Norris, University of Rochester (Rochester, NY)
Beverly W. Lubit, J.D., Ph.D., Lowenstein Sandler PC (Roseland, NJ)



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0