Identifying and Protecting

Trade Secrets

Maximizing Value and Preventing Misappropriation

Thursday, July 12, 2007

About

Do not let your valuable proprietary information become someone else’s profit center

Placing your trade secrets in the wrong hands and without proper controls – whether intentionally or inadvertently – can mean the company’s demise. And when a secret is the company’s principal source of revenue, protecting it becomes everyone’s responsibility – a challenging and daunting task in today’s corporate environment where attrition rates are higher than ever. When employees leave, trade secrets leave with them, and new employees bring other companies’ trade secrets in.

With so many legal and business components to identifying and protecting trade secrets, a comprehensive understanding of them all is imperative.

Knowledge of intellectual property (including patents), and how it intersects with employment and antitrust law is crucial. Tantamount to crafting the legal framework is implementing valuation strategies—especially when SOX compliance comes into play.

Ensure that daily challenges of protecting trade secrets are met.

Now is the time to get ahead of the curve, and safeguard your company against jeopardizing valuable information in the process. American Conference Institute’s publication from Identifying and Protecting Trade Secrets brings together top in-house and private counsel from diverse industries and practice areas. They are poised to bring you the most practical, up-to-date information on:

  • Auditing the company’s trade secret practices, and identifying means for improving them
  • Determining which route will yield the best results—trade secret or patent protection
  • Implementing ironclad employment practices to ensure maximum protection
  • Developing a system for meeting multiple statutory requirements
  • Ensuring trade secret protection overseas

Contents & Contributors

About

Do not let your valuable proprietary information become someone else’s profit center

Placing your trade secrets in the wrong hands and without proper controls – whether intentionally or inadvertently – can mean the company’s demise. And when a secret is the company’s principal source of revenue, protecting it becomes everyone’s responsibility – a challenging and daunting task in today’s corporate environment where attrition rates are higher than ever. When employees leave, trade secrets leave with them, and new employees bring other companies’ trade secrets in.

With so many legal and business components to identifying and protecting trade secrets, a comprehensive understanding of them all is imperative.

Knowledge of intellectual property (including patents), and how it intersects with employment and antitrust law is crucial. Tantamount to crafting the legal framework is implementing valuation strategies—especially when SOX compliance comes into play.

Ensure that daily challenges of protecting trade secrets are met.

Now is the time to get ahead of the curve, and safeguard your company against jeopardizing valuable information in the process. American Conference Institute’s publication from Identifying and Protecting Trade Secrets brings together top in-house and private counsel from diverse industries and practice areas. They are poised to bring you the most practical, up-to-date information on:

  • Auditing the company’s trade secret practices, and identifying means for improving them
  • Determining which route will yield the best results—trade secret or patent protection
  • Implementing ironclad employment practices to ensure maximum protection
  • Developing a system for meeting multiple statutory requirements
  • Ensuring trade secret protection overseas

Contents & Contributors

IDENTIFYING TRADE SECRETS AND THE MEANS FOR PROTECTING THEM
Harry Field, Counsel, The Boeing Company (El Segundo, CA)
James Blackburn, Arnold & Porter (San Francisco)
Renee Jackson, Fair Isaac Corporation (Minneapolis, MN)

TRADE SECRET OR PATENT: A PAINSTAKING BUT NECESSARY ANALYSIS
Timothy Hadlock, Chevron Corporation (San Ramon, CA)
Brian Bodine, Merchant & Gould (Seattle, WA)

WARNING EMPLOYEES ABOUT THE DANGERS OF DISSEMINATING TRADE SECRETS
Michael McLaughlin, Dell, Inc. (Round Rock, TX)
Carla Oakley, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP (San Francisco, CA)

PREVENTING DISCLOSURE OF TRADE SECRETS WITH IRONCLAD CONTRACTS AND STRINGENT HR PRACTICES
Roger Pascal, Schiff Hardin LLP (Chicago, IL)

CONTRASTING FEDERAL CRIMES UNDER THE ECONOMIC ESPIONAGE ACT (EEA) OF 1996 AND OTHER FEDERAL STATUES
Mark Krotoski, U.S. Attorney’s Office (San Francisco, CA)
Brad Ockene, Lovells (Chicago, IL)

PREVAILING IN TRADE SECRET LITIGATION
Chris Roblyer, The Coca-Cola Company (Atlanta, GA)
Jennifer B. Moore, Greenberg Traurig, LLP (Atlanta, GA)

MEETING STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS FOR TRADE SECRET PROTECTION IN ALL 50 STATES
Edward W. Gray, Morrison Foerster (Washington, DC)

PROTECTING INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY WHEN REPRESENTING FOREIGN CLIENTS
Morgan Tovey, Reed Smith LLP (San Francisco, CA)
Scott Piering, Cargill Incorporated (Wayzatta, MN)
Will Schultz, Merchant & Gould P.C. (Minneapolis, MN)

ADDRESSING THE DIFFICULTY AND IMPORTANCE OF THE VALUATION PROCESS
R. Mark Halligan, Lovells (Chicago, IL)

SAFEGUARDING PROPRIETARY MATERIAL AND INFORMATION IN MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS
Rodger Cole, Fenwick & West (Mountain View, CA)
Eunice Paik, Symantec Corporation (Cupertino, CA)

IMPLEMENTING AN EFFECTIVE TRADE SECRET PRESERVATION PROGRAM
Rodger Cole, Fenwick & West (Mountain View, CA)

PREVENTING DISSEMINATION OF TRADE SECRETS IN A HIGH-TECH ENVIRONMENT
Victoria Cundiff, Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker LLP (New York, NY)



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0