3rd National Forum on

Export Enforcement and Investigations

Tuesday, January 29, 2008

About

Recent high-profile cases arising under U.S. export control laws have captured headlines and confirmed that the enforcement climate is more aggressive than ever. Moreover, the Department of Justice is launching a "national export enforcement initiative" and Congress just passed legislation that increases penalties for violations of export control laws from $50,000 to $250,000 per violation. The stakes for companies facing export enforcement actions have increased dramatically.

Companies engaging in international sales or transfer of sensitive information or technology must be vigilant about preventing, detecting and investigating potential export control violations before they damage corporate reputations, affect the bottom line and shareholder value, and result in criminal convictions, prison terms and multi-millions dollar civil and criminal penalties.

Now in its third successful year, this one of a kind publication from the American Conference Institute "National Forum on Export Enforcement and Investigations" has once again assembled an exceptional faculty of top business, legal and government officials who provide you with practical information on how to defend your case and mitigate export control violations. Highlights from the program include:

  • Lessons from GM/General Dynamics and ITT cases and how to navigate deemed export and re-export issues
  • How the agencies coordinate administrative and criminal enforcement
  • What can be learned from recent voluntary disclosures
  • How prosecutors assess the seriousness of a violation
  • What agencies expect during a company visit and how to respond while protecting the company
  • When, how, and by whom should a global investigation be conducted
  • What positions have accountability beyond the boardroom
  • What to do when individual and corporate interests collide

Contents & Contributors

About

Recent high-profile cases arising under U.S. export control laws have captured headlines and confirmed that the enforcement climate is more aggressive than ever. Moreover, the Department of Justice is launching a "national export enforcement initiative" and Congress just passed legislation that increases penalties for violations of export control laws from $50,000 to $250,000 per violation. The stakes for companies facing export enforcement actions have increased dramatically.

Companies engaging in international sales or transfer of sensitive information or technology must be vigilant about preventing, detecting and investigating potential export control violations before they damage corporate reputations, affect the bottom line and shareholder value, and result in criminal convictions, prison terms and multi-millions dollar civil and criminal penalties.

Now in its third successful year, this one of a kind publication from the American Conference Institute "National Forum on Export Enforcement and Investigations" has once again assembled an exceptional faculty of top business, legal and government officials who provide you with practical information on how to defend your case and mitigate export control violations. Highlights from the program include:

  • Lessons from GM/General Dynamics and ITT cases and how to navigate deemed export and re-export issues
  • How the agencies coordinate administrative and criminal enforcement
  • What can be learned from recent voluntary disclosures
  • How prosecutors assess the seriousness of a violation
  • What agencies expect during a company visit and how to respond while protecting the company
  • When, how, and by whom should a global investigation be conducted
  • What positions have accountability beyond the boardroom
  • What to do when individual and corporate interests collide

Contents & Contributors

Monograph on U.S. Defense Trade Enforcement
John Pisa-Relli, Thales North America, Inc.

New Developments and Lessons Learned From the ITT Case
F. Amanda DeBusk, Hughes Hubbard & Reed

The “Fine Art” of Dealing with Export Enforcement Agencies
Kathleen Palma, General Electric
John Pisa-Relli, Thales North America, Inc.
Marlene Tarbell, General Motors Corporation
Michael D. Turner, MK Technologies

Special Compliance Monitors: Setting the Boundaries and Making the Relationship Work
Philip S. Rhoads, Rhoads & Reed
David R. Johnson, Vinson & Elkins

Attorney-Client Privilege and Work Product Protection
Kevin Wolf, Bryan Cave

Voluntary Disclosures
Carol Fuchs, Tyco International

Voluntary Disclosures: How the Government Evaluates Them and What to Include
Patrick R. Thesing, KBR, Inc.

Voluntary Disclosures: How the Government Evaluates Them and What to Include
Wendy Wysong, Clifford Chance

Managing the PR Impact of an Investigation or Voluntary Disclosure
Judah Best, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP

Anatomy of a Good Export Case
John Brownlee, U.S. Attorney, Western District of Virginia

Craig Missakian, Assistant U.S. Attorney, Central District of California

Edward C. O’Callaghan, Assistant U.S. Attorney, Southern District of New York Mary Carter Andrues, Howrey LLP

Managing and Responding to Government Visits and Inquiries
Melissa B. Mannino, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati

Conducting Effective Global Internal Investigations in the Export Control Arena
Edward J. Krauland, Steptoe & Johnson

Conducting Effective Global Investigations
Jason Monahan, General Dynamics Corporation

Export Controls Executives and Empowered Officials: Individual Responsibility and Accountability in Export Enforcement Actions and Criminal Prosecution
William M. Sullivan, Jr., Winston & Strawn LLP

Deemed Export Trends
Lawrence Fink, SAIC
Kay Georgi, Arent Fox LLP

When Employees are Under Investigation: What May You Say, When Should You Pay, Who Calls The Shots, and Why Should You Care?
Mark Rochon, Miller & Chevalier

United States Economic Sanctions
Dale Turza, Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0