Medical Office Building & Healthcare Facility Projects

Thursday, October 18, 2007

About

About 13 million square feet of medical office space is expected to be built in 2007 (according to Marcus & Millichap, a national real estate brokerage firm that has been tracking this area). With many hospitals also expanding, medical office construction is one of the country's hottest growth industries. In high-growth areas such as Texas, which has gained 239,000 jobs since May of last year, demographic and economic factors are spurring new activity and dramatically decreasing medical office vacancy rates. And the healthcare sector will continue to grow as the aging Baby Boomer generation fuels the increasing demand for expanded health care services. Many developers and investors - including high-performing REITs - are thus putting their money in medical facilities. And they are finding that healthcare institutions and physicians are very interested in partnering with them in new ventures.

As healthcare real estate gains attention it becomes more critical than ever that the players - those responsible for key real estate decisions for hospitals and health care groups, real estate investors, and developers/owners - understand the unique and complex issues that arise when buying, selling, developing, or leasing healthcare property. The financial risks are substantial - the build-outs are expensive, and many federal and state statutes impact these real estate transactions. Plus the unique concerns of owners, healthcare institutions and medical practitioners make for complex lease negotiations.

ACI has developed its Forum on Legal and Financial Strategies for Structuring and Investing in Medical Office Building and Healthcare Facility Projects to specifically address the unique problems that surface in these transactions. This publication from the event offers a practical overview of real-world issues that arise in healthcare real estate development and offer winning and workable strategies to resolve these issues.

Our faculty, consisting of leading experts and advisors for major healthcare systems as well as for property developers and owners, offer key negotiating advice and detailed knowledge to help you better handle various types of transactions. They will guide you through:

  • Structuring successful partnerships between healthcare institutions, physicians, and developers
  • Forming entities to avoid risks under the Stark Law and the False Claims Act
  • Assessing the risks in buying existing healthcare facilities
  • Selecting the right financing options
  • Negotiating medical office leases and tenant improvement allowances
  • Obtaining land use approvals and complying with regulatory requirements

Contents & Contributors

About

About 13 million square feet of medical office space is expected to be built in 2007 (according to Marcus & Millichap, a national real estate brokerage firm that has been tracking this area). With many hospitals also expanding, medical office construction is one of the country's hottest growth industries. In high-growth areas such as Texas, which has gained 239,000 jobs since May of last year, demographic and economic factors are spurring new activity and dramatically decreasing medical office vacancy rates. And the healthcare sector will continue to grow as the aging Baby Boomer generation fuels the increasing demand for expanded health care services. Many developers and investors - including high-performing REITs - are thus putting their money in medical facilities. And they are finding that healthcare institutions and physicians are very interested in partnering with them in new ventures.

As healthcare real estate gains attention it becomes more critical than ever that the players - those responsible for key real estate decisions for hospitals and health care groups, real estate investors, and developers/owners - understand the unique and complex issues that arise when buying, selling, developing, or leasing healthcare property. The financial risks are substantial - the build-outs are expensive, and many federal and state statutes impact these real estate transactions. Plus the unique concerns of owners, healthcare institutions and medical practitioners make for complex lease negotiations.

ACI has developed its Forum on Legal and Financial Strategies for Structuring and Investing in Medical Office Building and Healthcare Facility Projects to specifically address the unique problems that surface in these transactions. This publication from the event offers a practical overview of real-world issues that arise in healthcare real estate development and offer winning and workable strategies to resolve these issues.

Our faculty, consisting of leading experts and advisors for major healthcare systems as well as for property developers and owners, offer key negotiating advice and detailed knowledge to help you better handle various types of transactions. They will guide you through:

  • Structuring successful partnerships between healthcare institutions, physicians, and developers
  • Forming entities to avoid risks under the Stark Law and the False Claims Act
  • Assessing the risks in buying existing healthcare facilities
  • Selecting the right financing options
  • Negotiating medical office leases and tenant improvement allowances
  • Obtaining land use approvals and complying with regulatory requirements

Contents & Contributors

REAL ESTATE OPTIONS FOR HEALTHCARE INSTITUTIONS AND PRACTICES
Philip J. Camp, Shattuck Hammond Partners (New York, NY)

REAL ESTATE OPTIONS FOR HEALTHCARE INSTITUTIONS AND PRACTICES
Brent D. Tharp, GE Financial Services (La Jolla, CA)

COMPLYING WITH KEY ANTI-KICKBACK & FRAUD PROVISIONS
Peter G. Bergmann, Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft (New York, NY)
Pamela Landman, Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft (New York, NY)

SELECTED ISSUES IN THIRD PARTY DEVELOPMENT OF ON-CAMPUS MEDICAL OFFICE BUILDINGS
Timothy Blakeley, Tenet Healthcare Corporation ( Dallas, TX)

SELECTED ISSUES IN THIRD PARTY DEVELOPMENT OF ON-CAMPUS MEDICAL OFFICE BUILDINGS
Kevin Boyle, Citizens Bank of Masschusetts (Boston, MA)

JOINT VENTURES: HOSPITALS AND SURGERY CENTERS
David W. Hilgers, Brown Mccarroll (Austin, TX)

LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES: PROFITING FROM INCREASING DEMAND FOR SERVICES
Peter G. Bergmann, Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft (New York, NY)

BUYING A BUILDING FOR USE AS A MEDICAL FACILITY: LESSONS YOU DON’T WANT TO LEARN THE HARD WAY
Barron P. Bogatto, Jackson Walker (Houston, TX)
David C. Meckler, Latham & Watkins (Costa Mesa, CA)

MINIMIZING OPERATING RISKS: KEY STEPS FOR DEVELOPERS, HEALTHCARE REITS AND INVESTORS
Steven A. Eisenberg, Baker Hostetler (Cleveland, OH)
Stuart S. Kurlander, Latham & Watkins LLP (Washington, DC)

LEASING OFFICE AND LABORATORY SPACE
Sameer V. Mohan, Baker Hostetler (Houston, TX)

LEASING MEDICAL OFFICE FACILITIES: MARKET TRENDS AFFECTING LEASING
John O. Wilson, HSA Commercial Real Estate (Chicago, IL)



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0