Food-Borne Illness Litigation

Advanced Strategies for Managing and Defending Food Contamination Claims

Thursday, February 28, 2008

About

2007 was the year of the recall, with e-coli contamination increasing sharply in 2007 over the previous two years. And it’s not just beef recalls and e-coli contamination that are making the news… Peanut butter, spinach, pot pies and pizza; salmonella, listeria and other toxins… All kinds of food-borne illnesses and the ensuing litigation are on the rise, as experts point fingers at increased use of offshore food sources, a largely self-regulated industry, and other factors in an attempt to explain the sudden surge. It’s clearly a critical time for food companies, and the lawyers who advise them, to get valuable, practical information to enable you to minimize the likelihood of these situations and the ensuing litigation from occurring – and to manage the litigation appropriately when it arises.

To address these growing concerns, American Conference Institute has developed this publication from Preventing and Managing Food-Borne Illness Litigation. We’ve assembled a multi disciplinary faculty of epidemiologists, microbiologists, key regulators and top litigators in the area, and an agenda that covers all the issues that arise in litigating and settling these complex cases. Get strategic and practical insights into:

  • Understanding the science behind tracing and identifying a pathogen – so you can make or refute the causal link in your case
  • Getting back on track with consumers after a crisis: getting out the right message
  • Using Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests: why they are such an effective discovery tool in food borne illness cases
  • Deposing food-borne illness experts: tips and techniques
  • Effect of insurance coverage issues on how you proceed in a third party action
  • Analysis of where plaintiffs been most successful in food-borne illness class actions and MDL proceedings

Contents & Contributors

About

2007 was the year of the recall, with e-coli contamination increasing sharply in 2007 over the previous two years. And it’s not just beef recalls and e-coli contamination that are making the news… Peanut butter, spinach, pot pies and pizza; salmonella, listeria and other toxins… All kinds of food-borne illnesses and the ensuing litigation are on the rise, as experts point fingers at increased use of offshore food sources, a largely self-regulated industry, and other factors in an attempt to explain the sudden surge. It’s clearly a critical time for food companies, and the lawyers who advise them, to get valuable, practical information to enable you to minimize the likelihood of these situations and the ensuing litigation from occurring – and to manage the litigation appropriately when it arises.

To address these growing concerns, American Conference Institute has developed this publication from Preventing and Managing Food-Borne Illness Litigation. We’ve assembled a multi disciplinary faculty of epidemiologists, microbiologists, key regulators and top litigators in the area, and an agenda that covers all the issues that arise in litigating and settling these complex cases. Get strategic and practical insights into:

  • Understanding the science behind tracing and identifying a pathogen – so you can make or refute the causal link in your case
  • Getting back on track with consumers after a crisis: getting out the right message
  • Using Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests: why they are such an effective discovery tool in food borne illness cases
  • Deposing food-borne illness experts: tips and techniques
  • Effect of insurance coverage issues on how you proceed in a third party action
  • Analysis of where plaintiffs been most successful in food-borne illness class actions and MDL proceedings

Contents & Contributors

CURRENT AND EMERGING FOOD CONTAMINATION LITIGATION: TRENDS, NEW RISKS AND RECENT DECISIONS
William Marler, Marler Clark (Seattle, WA)
Paul L. Kassirer, Lester Schwab Katz & Dwyer, LLP (New York, NY)

ANATOMY OF FOODBORNE OUTBREAK AND RECALLS
Mansour Samadpour, PhD, Institute of Environmental Health

MAKING THE CAUSAL LINK: INVESTIGATING FOODBORNE DISEASE OUTBREAKS AT THE MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Stephanie Meyer, MPH, Minnesota Department of Health (Lake Forest Park, WA)

FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS – A LOCAL PUBLIC HEALTH PERSPECTIVE
Alan Melnick, MD, MPH, Oregon Health and Science University (Minneapolis, MN)

CRISIS CONTROL: STRATEGIC RESPONSE TO FOOD RECALLS
Sarah L. Brew, Greene Espel (Minneapolis, MN)

ASSESSING DAMAGES IN FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS LITIGATION: RESOURCES FOR AND A VIEW FROM THE FRONT LINES
Ralph Weber, Gass Weber & Mullins (Milwaukee, WI)
Amelia A. McCarthy, Gass Weber & Mullins (Milwaukee, WI)

THE COMPLETE MEDICAL PICTURE: THE KEY TO PURSUING OR DEFENDING FOOD BORNE ILLNESS CASES
Christopher T. Lee, Dickie McCamey & Chilcote PC (Pittsburgh, PA)

GETTING THE RECORDS YOU NEED: REQUESTING PUBLIC RECORDS
Patti Waller, Marler Clark (Seattle, WA)

MITIGATING AGAINST SIGNIFICANT FOOD LIABILITY CLAIMS: SAFE FOOD HANDLING IS NOT ENOUGH
Kenneth M. Odza, Stoel Rives LLP (Seattle, WA)

FOOD SAFETY: CDC’S ROLE
Arthur P. Liang, MD, MPH, Centers for Disease Control (Atlanta, GA)

TRYING AND SETTLING SINGLE-PLAINTIFF FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS CASES
Alan M. Maxwell, Weinberg Wheeler Hudgins Gunn & Dial
William Marler, Marler Clark (Seattle, WA)

COMPLEX FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS CASES: CLASS ACTION AND MULTI-DISTRICT LITIGATION
James F. Neale, McGuire Woods LLP (Charlottesville, VA)
Ron Simon, Simon & Luke LLP (Houston, TX)

INSURANCE COVERAGE FOR FOOD CONTAMINATION CLAIMS
Lisa Shreiber, Cozen O’Connor (New York, NY)



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0