Export Controls

Wednesday, May 28, 2008

About

The United States continues to take a more aggressive approach to enforcement in all areas of international trade regulation and national security. The Departments of State, Commerce, Treasury and Homeland Security are vigorously policing the export activities of U.S. firms and their foreign trading partners to ensure strict compliance with export control and economic sanctions laws.

Rising government expectations and new regulatory standards amplify risks for U.S. and foreign companies in our increasingly global business environment. Export controls are becoming ever more complex and restrictive, and U.S. exporters must develop robust internal export control compliance programs that do not unduly hamper legitimate trade and also comply with U.S. and local laws.

ACIs’ National Forum on Export Controls is the publication that export professionals rely on for comprehensive, insightful, and practical guidance on critical global export compliance issues. Benefit from the practical perspective of seasoned corporate export compliance executives. Get an update on regulatory and policy initiatives from top Government officials and learn how industry is setting up internal controls to comply in this constantly changing global legal landscape.

Contents & Contributors

About

The United States continues to take a more aggressive approach to enforcement in all areas of international trade regulation and national security. The Departments of State, Commerce, Treasury and Homeland Security are vigorously policing the export activities of U.S. firms and their foreign trading partners to ensure strict compliance with export control and economic sanctions laws.

Rising government expectations and new regulatory standards amplify risks for U.S. and foreign companies in our increasingly global business environment. Export controls are becoming ever more complex and restrictive, and U.S. exporters must develop robust internal export control compliance programs that do not unduly hamper legitimate trade and also comply with U.S. and local laws.

ACIs’ National Forum on Export Controls is the publication that export professionals rely on for comprehensive, insightful, and practical guidance on critical global export compliance issues. Benefit from the practical perspective of seasoned corporate export compliance executives. Get an update on regulatory and policy initiatives from top Government officials and learn how industry is setting up internal controls to comply in this constantly changing global legal landscape.

Contents & Contributors

NEW STANDARDS FOR AN “EFFECTIVE” EXPORT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM
Wendy Wysong, Clifford Chance (Washington, DC)

EXECUTIVE/SENIOR MANAGEMENT SUPPORT
Ron Roos, ITT Corporation (Tysons Corner, VA)

COMPLYING WITH THE LETTER AND SPIRIT OF THE LAW: GETTING MANAGEMENT AND BOARD BUY-IN
Erin L. Crockett, Dresser Inc. (Addison, TX)

THE VALUE OF A STRONG EXPORT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM
Julie Felgar, The Boeing Company (Washington, DC)

DEVELOPING AN EFFECTIVE LICENSING STRATEGY FOR CHINA EXPORTS AND REEXPORTS
Felicia L. Faragasso, SAIC (McLean, VA)
Christopher R. Wall, Pillsbury Winthrop (Washington, DC)

EXPORT COMPLIANCE IN CANADA: DUAL NATIONAL RULES & HUMAN RIGHTS / PRIVACY LAWS
Geoff MacKendrick, Raytheon Canada (Waterloo, ON)

DEEMED EXPORT COMPLIANCE IN CANADA: BALANCING U.S. DUAL NATIONAL RULES WITH CANADIAN HUMAN RIGHTS AND PRIVACY LAWS
John Boscariol, McCarthy Tetrault (Toronto, ON)

CFIUS EMERGING ISSUES
James A. (Del) Renigar, General Electric (Washington, DC)

NATIONAL SECURITY REVIEWS (CFIUS)
John B. Reynolds, III, Wiley Rein (Washington, DC)

RESTRICTED PARTIES SCREENING
Mark E. Sagrans, E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company (Wilmington, DE)

DENIED PARTIES SCREENING
Paula L. McDowell, Rolls-Royce North America (Indianapolia, IN)

MANAGING AN EFFECTIVE RESTRICTED PARTIES SCREENING PROGRAM
Michael L. Burton, Arent Fox (Washington, DC)

DUE DILIGENCE: WHAT TO DO IF YOUR GOOD WORK UNCOVERS A POTENTIAL EXPORT CONTROLS OR SANCTIONS VIOLATION
Josephine Aiello Lebeau, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati (Washington, DC)

DUE DILIGENCE: WHAT TO DO IF YOUR GOOD WORK UNCOVERS A POTENTIAL EXPORT CONTROLS OR SANCTIONS VIOLATION
Melanie S. Cibik, Teledyne Technologies (Thousand Oaks, CA)

DUE DILIGENCE: WHAT TO DO IF YOUR GOOD WORK UNCOVERS A POTENTIAL EXPORT CONTROLS OR SANCTIONS VIOLATION
Carol Fuchs, Tyco International (Washington, DC)

US SANCTIONS REQUIREMENTS - TOUGHER AND BROADER IN 2008
Serena D. Moe, Citigroup Inc. (Washington, DC)

HOW TO MEET TOUGHER AND BROADER U.S. SANCTIONS REQUIREMENTS - AROUND THE GLOBE
J. Daniel Chapman, Baker Hughes (Houston, TX)

THE BASICS OF THE U.S. ECONOMIC SANCTIONS LAWS
Greta Lichtenbaum, O’Melveny & Myers (Washington, DC)

HOW TO CONTROL AND MAXIMIZE TECHNOLOGY FLOWE WITH GLOBAL SERVICES R&D: OUTSOURCING TO INDIA
Ben H. Flowe, Jr., Berliner Corcoran & Rowe (Washington, DC)

OUTSOURCING TO INDIA: HOW TO CONTROL THE FLOW OF TECHNOLOGY IN A SERVICES AND R&D ENVIRONMENT
Dale Rill, Honeywell International Inc. (Washington, DC)

OUTSOURCING TO INDIA: HOW TO CONTROL AND MAXIMIZE EAR TECHNOLOGY FLOW WITH GLOBAL SERVICES AND R & D
Tina Luther, Alliant Techsystems, Inc. (Edina, MN)

OFAC AND EAR DE MINIMIS EXCLUSIONS FROM REEXPORT CONTROLS
Larry E. Christensen, Miller & Chevalier (Washington, DC)

EU REGIME ON EXPORT CONTROLS & SANCTIONS
Wolter Boerman, Royal Philips Electronics (Eindhoven, The Netherlands)

COMPLYING WITH NEW CHINESE ENCRYPTION REGULATIONS
Steven Brotherton, Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen & Loewy (San Francisco, CA)



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