3rd European Forum on

Anti-Corruption

Minimizing the Risk of Improper Payments in an Era of Increased International Enforcement

Tuesday, June 17, 2008

About

Is your company prepared to deal with FCPA liability and the changing legal landscape of anti-corruption enforcement worldwide? With the United States running over 50 FCPA investigations, covering a total of 13 European companies, ethics and compliance executives must raise their company’s defenses. High profile cases, such as Siemens, emphasize the colossal risks for companies and individuals involved. Corporate corruption scandals continue to capture headlines as leading multi-nationals become targets of investigations. In the last year, the increase in the number of local enforcement actions, stricter penalties for corporate offenders and active cooperation among enforcement officials in various countries verify that there is no escape from international and local anti-corruption requirements.

In this high risk environment, ensuring the efficacy and harmonization of anti-corruption compliance programs is an imperative for all global companies. With proper implementation and oversight, a comprehensive compliance program can become a valuable corporate asset that enhances company operations, facilitates compliance with laws and mitigates damages when a violation occurs. Failure to implement preventative measures is sure to result in substantially increased penalties should an issue arise. Companies must be vigilant about preventing, detecting and investigating potential anti-corruption violations before they damage corporate reputation, affect the bottom line and result in hefty monetary penalties.

This publication from the American Conference Institute’s, “European Forum on Anti-Corruption”, has assembled an exceptional faculty of seasoned corporate ethics and compliance executives, attorneys and government officials, who will provide the latest information on:

  • How local investigations and prosecutions are changing the enforcement landscape
  • Overcoming cultural and legal obstacles in building a company wide compliance culture
  • Determining when payment of travel, entertainment and lodging of foreign officials is bordering on a violation
  • Standards to apply when evaluating commercial intermediaries
  • How due diligence focused on anti-money laundering yields red flags for corruptions cases
  • Resources, tools and techniques leading companies are using to implement and monitor global anti-corruption compliance programs
  • How European anti-bribery investigations differ from US investigations
  • Reciprocity and mutual assistance between regulators

Contents & Contributors

About

Is your company prepared to deal with FCPA liability and the changing legal landscape of anti-corruption enforcement worldwide? With the United States running over 50 FCPA investigations, covering a total of 13 European companies, ethics and compliance executives must raise their company’s defenses. High profile cases, such as Siemens, emphasize the colossal risks for companies and individuals involved. Corporate corruption scandals continue to capture headlines as leading multi-nationals become targets of investigations. In the last year, the increase in the number of local enforcement actions, stricter penalties for corporate offenders and active cooperation among enforcement officials in various countries verify that there is no escape from international and local anti-corruption requirements.

In this high risk environment, ensuring the efficacy and harmonization of anti-corruption compliance programs is an imperative for all global companies. With proper implementation and oversight, a comprehensive compliance program can become a valuable corporate asset that enhances company operations, facilitates compliance with laws and mitigates damages when a violation occurs. Failure to implement preventative measures is sure to result in substantially increased penalties should an issue arise. Companies must be vigilant about preventing, detecting and investigating potential anti-corruption violations before they damage corporate reputation, affect the bottom line and result in hefty monetary penalties.

This publication from the American Conference Institute’s, “European Forum on Anti-Corruption”, has assembled an exceptional faculty of seasoned corporate ethics and compliance executives, attorneys and government officials, who will provide the latest information on:

  • How local investigations and prosecutions are changing the enforcement landscape
  • Overcoming cultural and legal obstacles in building a company wide compliance culture
  • Determining when payment of travel, entertainment and lodging of foreign officials is bordering on a violation
  • Standards to apply when evaluating commercial intermediaries
  • How due diligence focused on anti-money laundering yields red flags for corruptions cases
  • Resources, tools and techniques leading companies are using to implement and monitor global anti-corruption compliance programs
  • How European anti-bribery investigations differ from US investigations
  • Reciprocity and mutual assistance between regulators

Contents & Contributors

ANTI-CORRUPTION ENFORCEMENT EXPLOSION IN EUROPE: ITALY
Bruno Cova, Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker, LLP (Italy)

ANTI-CORRUPTION IN GERMANY
Christof Gaudig, Mayer Brown LLP (Germany)

THE EXTRATERRITORIAL REACH OF THE U.S. FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT: ENFORCEMENT TRENDS AND THE EFFECTS OF INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS
Lucinda Ann Low, Steptoe & Johnson LLP (USA)

HOSTING, TRAVELING, ENTERTAINING AND LODGING FOREIGN OFFICIALS: LIMITS OF PERMISSIBLE PAYMENTS
Patrick Späth, Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr (Germany)

GIFTS AND HOSPITALITY GUIDELINES
Carolyn Lindsey, Trace International, Inc. (USA)
Alexandra A. Wrage, Trace International, Inc. (USA)

CREATING A VALUES BASED CULTURE
David Harris, Lockheed Martin (UK)

CREATING A CORPORATE ETHICS AND COMPLIANCE CULTURE
Jean-Daniel Laine, Alstom Transport (Italy)

CREATING A CORPORATE ETHICS AND COMPLIANCE CULTURE STARTING AT THE TOP
Jean-Claude Najar, GE Commercial Finance, EMEA (France)

DUE DILIGENCE OF BUSINESS PARTNERS AND AGENTS
Gary DiBianco, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (USA)

THE INTERSECTION OF ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING AND ANTI-CORRUPTION
Henri Quintard, BNP Paribas (France)

THE INTERSECTION OF ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING AND ANTI-CORRUPTION PART II: “BEYOND THE BANKS”
Mark E. Matthews, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP (USA)

BUILDING AND IMPLEMENTING A VALUE-BASED ANTI-CORRUPTION COMPLIANCE PROGRAM
Gerard Kuster, Suez Group (France)

IMPLEMENTING A VALUES BASED GLOBAL ETHICS POLICY
Ruth Steinholtz, Borealis Group (Austria)

CONDUCTING A COST EFFECTIVE INTERNAL INVESTIGATION: OVERCOMING CONFLICTING LOCAL LAWS AND TRADITIONS
Dr. Christoph Klahold, ThyssenKrupp Elevator AG (Germany)
Nic Carrington, Deloitte & Touche LLP (UK)
Robert A Goldspink, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP (USA)
David S. Lorello, Steptoe & Johnson LLP (UK)

IMPLEMENTING BOOKS AND RECORDS CONTROLS TO ENSURE ANTI-CORRUPTION COMPLIANCE
Richard Grime, O’Melveny & Myers LLP (USA)

IMPLEMENTING BOOKS AND RECORDS CONTROLS TO ENSURE ANTI-CORRUPTION COMPLIANCE
Claudius O. Sokenu, Mayer Brown LLP (USA)

APPLICATION OF THE OECD ANTI BRIBERY CONVENTION
Nicola Bonucci, Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (France)



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0