Day 1 - Monday, November 17, 2014

9:00
IT Licensing Boot Camp: Drafting Contracts That Meet Current Business Needs While Avoiding Unwanted Outcomes
1:00
Co-Chairs’ Opening Remarks
1:15
Delving into the Future of Open Source and Cloud Technologies: Understanding the Present and Embracing the Opportunities Ahead
2:30
Protecting Your Data: Managing Security and Privacy Risks in a Nebulous Environment
3:45
Critical Compliance Issues: Fulfilling the Conditions in Subscriptions, Licenses, and Agreements to Avoid Risks and Liabilities
5:00
Conference Adjourns to Day Two

Day 2 - Tuesday, November 18, 2014

7:15
Registration and Continental Breakfast
8:00
Co-Chairs’ Opening Remarks and Recap of Day One
8:15
Achieving International Expertise: Attaining a Comprehensive Understanding of Global Approaches to Data Protection
9:30
Managing the Movement of Data in the Cloud When Data is Transferred Overseas Without Your Permission
10:30
Morning Refreshment Break
10:45
Repositioning Your Company’s Open Source and Cloud Strategies: Patent and Copyright Approaches in the License Agreement
11:45
Getting What You Sign For: Developing Best Practices for Drafting IT Service Agreements to Minimize Risks, Liabilities, and Ambiguities
12:30
Networking Luncheon
1:30
Breaking Up is Hard to Do: The Importance of Having a Well-Defined Exit Strategy
2:45
Afternoon Refreshment Break
3:00
Ensuring the Continuity of Business Operations to Raise Profits and Curtail Interruptions in Service
4:00
Examining Data Ownership in Light of the Advances in Technological Innovation: Evolving Data and Smart Applications
5:00
Conference Adjourns

Day 3 - Wednesday, November 19, 2014

9:00
Live Mock Negotiation: Strategies for Avoiding Common Stumbling Blocks

Day 1 - Monday, November 17, 2014

9:00
IT Licensing Boot Camp: Drafting Contracts That Meet Current Business Needs While Avoiding Unwanted Outcomes

Adam Mishcon
General Counsel
Sencha Inc. (Redwood City, CA)

Eleanor Hynes Yost
Partner
Goodwin Procter LLP

Jon D. Grossman
Partner
Dickstein Shapiro LLP (Washington, DC)

IT service agreements are negotiated by CIOs, CTOs, non-lawyer contract professionals, attorneys, and IT managers at various levels during the contract negotiation process. This licensing boot camp will provide you with a comprehensive overview of the business, legal, and technical issues that drive IT service agreements in order to help you close deals with ease. Join your colleagues as they drill down into the licensing fundamentals and nuances in this interactive workshop. Through a series of practical examples, lawyers and non-lawyers alike will have the opportunity to learn and discuss the essential terms to consider in any licensing agreement while balancing the business, financial, and technical motivators.

Workshop highlights include:

• Drafting a clear and unambiguous license grant
 Delineating the scope of uses of the product
 Assigning the rights to make or control derivative works
• Defining ownership, use limitations, and affiliate use restrictions
• Revisiting standard clauses and what constitutes reasonable or customary contract positions by licensors and licensees
 Outlining the payment terms
 Clarifying the remedies and choice of forum
 Addressing payment collection and interest on late payments
• Tackling confidentiality and risk assessment concerns
• Anticipating and incorporating future M&A needs in the present agreement
• Overcoming conflicts between legal and business interests
• Protecting your position when agreements incorporate evolving pricing and licensing models
 Maneuvering challenges raised by alternative delivery mechanisms
 Understanding the issues associated with software downloads to mobile devices
 Utilizing appropriate pricing models to achieve your goals
 Facilitating accurate licensing procurement assessments in a world of virtual servers and multi-core processors
• Identifying contract hazards to avoid
• Establishing and ensuring adherence to an internal protocol to safeguard efficiency and consistency across all company licenses and agreements
• Avoiding creating a franchise agreement which can result in a hidden minefield
• Incorporating additional cost-saving options into your negotiating strategies

9:00 am – 12:00 pm (Registration begins at 8:15 am)

1:00
Co-Chairs’ Opening Remarks

Rebecca Hamilton Gahete
Deputy General Counsel and Director, Information Management
JM Family Enterprises, Inc. (Deerfield Beach, FL)

Mark Grossman
Counsel
Tannenbaum Helpern Syracuse & Hirschtritt (New York, NY)

1:15
Delving into the Future of Open Source and Cloud Technologies: Understanding the Present and Embracing the Opportunities Ahead

Alex Teu
Executive Vice President and General Counsel
Oxygen Cloud (Redwood City, CA)

Michael T. Yang
Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary
Proofpoint, Inc. (Sunnyvale, CA)

Jeffrey Kaufman
Patent Counsel - Open Source Legal Group
Qualcomm Technologies, Inc.

Helen Tieh
Director, Legal
NVIDIA Corporation

Companies must make strategic decisions to advance technological needs while understanding the legal risks and accurately predicting how the technology will evolve in the near future. The benefits of open source and cloud computing are increasingly touted for lowering costs and conducting business activities more efficiently. On the other hand, due to the rapid advances in technology and security concerns, companies remain wary of adopting new forms of technology too quickly. This panel will address the current state of affairs with open source and cloud computing while understanding the imminent changes to come in this landscape.

Open Source
• Assessing open source software and appreciating the benefits of incorporating open source in a commercial product
• Grasping the interplay between open source and its potential impact on proprietary software
• Evaluating viral licenses and understanding whether an open source license is appropriate
 Determining when an open source license creates a category
of derivative work
 Comprehending how to mitigate unfriendly terms in an open
source license
• Establishing the use of open source code in software development
 How is the proprietary use of the software affected?
• Implementing open source review boards to examine open source
licenses
• Devising protocols to track whether open source software is being
used in tandem with proprietary or commercial software
 Analyzing how the use of open source may affect future
M&A activity
 Defining and attributing ownership during joint ventures
and post-consolidation
• Scrutinizing the future of open source software and its effect on technological innovation
 Exploring how mobile operating systems are propelling forward the use of open source software
 Predicting the implications of open source APIs for the Internet of Things

Cloud
• Demystifying the differences between Infrastructure as a Service
(“IaaS”), Platform as a Service (“PaaS”), Software as a Service
(“SaaS”), and the hybrid models of these services
 Resolving which cloud services to utilize as part of a business
decision
• Recognizing the difference between cloud services and data
hosting
• Exploring the shift between on-premises software and cloud computing
 Understanding how moving to the cloud model has shifted norms from licensing agreements to subscription-based services
• Appreciating the benefits of cloud computing in big data analytics
• Examining whether a move to the cloud is tenable given the business, legal, and regulatory factors
• Making the transition to the cloud at a reasonable cost
• Analyzing when an on-premises solution is still the best option
• Being cognizant of the differences between cloud and virtualization: what exactly is being licensed?

2:30
Protecting Your Data: Managing Security and Privacy Risks in a Nebulous Environment

Bill Hayden CIPP/US
Senior Attorney
Microsoft Corporation (Redmond, WA)

Lothar Determann
Member
Baker & McKenzie LLP

Sheila M. FitzPatrick
Worldwide Legal Data Governance Counsel & Chief Data Privacy Counsel
NetApp, Inc. (Sunnyvale, CA)

Cynthia Sarno CIPP/US, CIPP/IT
Chief Privacy Counsel
Farmers Group, Inc.

​• Dissecting the motivations behind the vendor and customer’s security policies
• Integrating clear terms for how the data will be protected in the agreement
• Understanding the importance of knowing exactly how your data can be used, will be used, and is being used
• Exploring state laws on private information, and scrutinizing them in the context of data breaches
• Defining “personally identifiable information” and how PII creates special data privacy considerations
• Auditing a vendor’s or service provider’s security protocols and appreciating what to look out for to protect your data and privacy
• Developing best practices for due diligence of subcontractors and other third-parties handling and storing the data
• Inspecting the applicable privacy policies for a service and understanding the relationship with companies’ in-house privacy policies
• Mitigating risks to ensure compliance with legal or regulatory guidelines
• Addressing a vendor’s privacy policies in an agreement to confirm that the agreement overrides any posted privacy policies
• Understanding the risks involved on the vendor and customer sides
• Conducting due diligence into a provider’s offering to understand the impact on data security
• Single tenant vs. multitenant hosting
• Complying with legal, regulatory, and industry standards to safeguard data in the cloud
• Global Data Protection Laws
• EU Cloud Computing Directive
• APAC Cloud Computing Privacy Code
• Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act
• Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPPA”)
• Sarbanes-Oxley Act
• FCC
• FTC 
• Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard
• Understanding where there are no industry standards
• Comprehending vendor concerns with respect to customers’ data on the cloud
• Devising strategies to prevent illegal materials on the cloud
• Balancing vendor responsibilities to conduct software security screenings with the customer’s duty to conduct due diligence
• Determining liability to third-parties
• Examining disclosure and remediation requirements to address privacy or security breaches
• Understanding who bears the burden and at what cost
• Establishing data security concerns in licenses that cross international borders
• Surveying government access to data and the industry’s reactions
• Case study: Gathering industry reactions to government request for data and exploring its evolution
• In the Matter of a Warrant to Search a Certain E-Mail Account Controlled and Maintained by Microsoft Corporation, 13 Mag. 2814 (Apr. 25, 2014).
• Electronic Communications Privacy Act
• Observing how companies and governments abroad handle access to confidential information
• European governments’ access to Vodafone’s network and/or user data
• Exploring unique ways for governments and companies to cooperate in collecting, reviewing, and analyzing big data sets

3:45
Critical Compliance Issues: Fulfilling the Conditions in Subscriptions, Licenses, and Agreements to Avoid Risks and Liabilities

Jeremy Logsdon
Assistant General Counsel
Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company (Columbus, OH)

Anthony Bishop
VP and Divisional General Counsel SaaS Division
Citrix Systems, Inc. (Santa Barbara, CA)

Nissa M. Strottman
Senior Counsel, Cloud Computing and Open Source
Hewlett-Packard Company (Palo Alto, CA)

Businesses routinely struggle with IT service agreements, which can be a complex and time-consuming process. At the same time, companies face the threat of audits and even litigation, as vendors and organizations seek to impose compliance with its customers’ legal obligations. In addition, the legal obligations associated with open source may become more complicated as the technology increasingly becomes more advanced. On the other hand, with cloud services, customers must scrutinize the terms of their subscriptions meticulously in order to adhere to their obligations. Points of discussion shall include:

• Understanding the common obligations in an open source license
 Focusing on General Public License (“GPL”) and its potential issues in a commercial environment
 Assessing companies’ strategies to address the issues 
associated with GPL
 Knowing which actions trigger certain obligations under the open source license
 Can a licensor prevent reverse engineering?
• Establishing in-house open source compliance programs and managing the software supply chain
 Forecasting potential outcomes when not complying with an open source license to make the case for a compliance program
 Incorporating open source code into products in an organized fashion
• Defining a “user” on the cloud
 Managing the relationships between the  “customer,” “employee,” “subsidiary,” “subcontractor,” “affiliate,” and “joint venture”
 Covering an employee outside of the United States
• Identifying the diff erences between the various license models
 Concurrent license model
 Number license model
 Usage based license model
 Named user license model
 What happens when a licensed employee leaves the company?
• Incorporating clear terms into the agreement to address auditing
 Establishing the practical need for audits on the vendor side while respecting confidentiality and privacy needs on the customer side
 Identifying the triggers for conducting audits
 Addressing who will conduct the audits
 Determining which party assumes the cost of conducting an audit
• Exploring self-reporting obligations in the agreement and understanding whether it helps lessen the frequency of audits
• Formulating creative strategies for how an audit can be conducted to save costs

5:00
Conference Adjourns to Day Two

Day 2 - Tuesday, November 18, 2014

7:15
Registration and Continental Breakfast
8:00
Co-Chairs’ Opening Remarks and Recap of Day One

Rebecca Hamilton Gahete
Deputy General Counsel and Director, Information Management
JM Family Enterprises, Inc. (Deerfield Beach, FL)

Mark Grossman
Counsel
Tannenbaum Helpern Syracuse & Hirschtritt (New York, NY)

8:15
Achieving International Expertise: Attaining a Comprehensive Understanding of Global Approaches to Data Protection

John O’Connor
Partner and Head of Technology and Commercial Contracts and Data Protection
Matheson (Dublin IE)

Gabriela Kennedy
Partner and Head of Asia IP & TMT Group
Mayer Brown JSM (Hong Kong)

Christine E. Lyon
Partner
Morrison & Foerster LLP

Fabian Niemann
Partner
Bird & Bird (Frankfurt, DE)

• Anticipating variations in the culture of licensing in the U.S. versus abroad by conducting pre-licensing due diligence

• Examining how differences in foreign laws, contract styles, expectations of local practices and variations in language can impact your deal
• Preparing for Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) and its impact on multinational companies and cloud computing
 Tackling the GDPR’s definition of the “cloud”
 Focusing on how the GDPR will affect the U.S. market for cloud computing
 Assessing the factors that trigger when U.S. companies will be subject to European data protection laws
 Analyzing how the EU will most likely enforce the data protection laws against U.S. companies with no physical place of business in Europe
 Evaluating the GDPR’s potential effect on big data analytics
• Bracing for the reform of the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Framework
• Exploring legal regulations and business practices unique to specific jurisdictions
 Observing contractual hazards and contract enforceability issues that arise when dealing in Asia and Latin America
• Determining when you may need to set up a business unit or operations in a particular country
• Identifying how the product will be protected
 Negotiating a procedure in the contract for identifying unauthorized copies
 Investigating whether a regulatory scheme is in place to help prevent unauthorized copying and distribution of the software
• Considering the impact that local tax regulations can have on your deal

9:30
Managing the Movement of Data in the Cloud When Data is Transferred Overseas Without Your Permission

Jasbir Kaur Khalsa CIPP/US
Attorney
Microsoft Corporation

John Pavolotsky CIPP/US
Senior Attorney
Intel Corporation (Santa Clara, US)

Paola Zeni
Director, Global Privacy, Legal & Public Affairs
Symantec Corporation (Mountain View, CA)

• Integrating clauses in the agreement to prevent data hosted on the cloud from being moved to another country without your prior approval

• Exploring a vendor’s motivation for moving data off-shore
• Incorporating terms and clauses in the agreement to maintain control over the data that is hosted in the cloud
 Working with cloud vendors to control where the data will be sent
• Responding to the security and privacy issues that arise when hosted data is moved off shore
• What happens when the movement of data overseas causes the customer to violate a law overseas?
• Gaining best practices for enforcement in a foreign jurisdiction in case of data breach overseas
• Export considerations: Understanding when cloud users and providers are subject to export requirements
 Analyzing the relationship between the Export Administration
Regulations (“EAR”) and the U.S. Department of Commerce’s  Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) with respect to the export of data on the cloud
 Considering the export obligations that may be triggered with certain types of encryption

10:30
Morning Refreshment Break
10:45
Repositioning Your Company’s Open Source and Cloud Strategies: Patent and Copyright Approaches in the License Agreement

Keith Bergelt
Chief Executive Officer
Open Invention Network (Durham, NC)

Karen F. Copenhaver
Partner
Choate Hall & Stewart LLP (Boston, MA)

Theodore McCullough
Senior IP Counsel
EMC Corporation

• Cloud Service Companies v. Product Companies — Understanding the best ways to ensure differentiation of your service and product offerings via an IP strategy that includes open source licensed software

 What the open source licensing model tells us about using open source licensed software to enforce service and product differentiation?
 Labor based v. IP based service and product differentiation — human capital as critical to preserving differentiation, not traditional IP rights
 The importance of “Hacking” — time to market and first mover advantages arising from using open source licensed software
 What Oracle America, Inc. v. Google, Inc. (Fed. Cir. 2014) tells us about using copyrights to enforce service and product differentiation?
 Defining IP ownership on improved or modified software using open source
 Understanding Oracle’s effect on the Internet of Things
 What Alice Corp. PTY. LTD v. CLS Bank Int’l (2014) tells us about using patents to enforce service and product differentiation?
 Obtaining the newest updates on the patentability of software
 Patent development strategies for cloud service and product companies in light of Alice
• Uses and misuses of content — Addressing the implications of American Broadcasting Companies, Inc. v. Aereo, Inc. (2014) on cloud computing
 Dissecting Aereo’s technology and deciphering the significant implications on Internet streaming on the cloud
 Clarifying how copyright infringement affects cloud computing
 Predicting the possible repercussions on cloud storage and cloud innovation
• Assessing organizational vulnerabilities to infringement suits
 Declining enforceability of patent rights v. the increasing enforceability of copyrights and trade secrets
 Curtailing of patent rights — Transcore, Myriad, Nautilus, Alice
 Enhancing of copyrights and trade secret rights — Aereo, Altavion v. Konica Minolta

11:45
Getting What You Sign For: Developing Best Practices for Drafting IT Service Agreements to Minimize Risks, Liabilities, and Ambiguities

William A. Tanenbaum
Partner, Head, IP & Technology Transactions Group and Green Tech & Sustainability Group
Kaye Scholer LLP

Kenneth Labach
General Counsel
Datalex (New York, NY)

Mia Chiu
Associate General Counsel
Mindjet Corporation (San Francisco, CA)

Janet P. Knaus
Partner
Warner Norcross & Judd LLP (Grand Rapids, MI)

• Distinguishing whether the IT service in question is the appropriate choice for the customer

• Recognizing any potential gaps in the service required by the customer and provided by the vendor
• Understanding when a deal is ripe enough to go to the lawyers to reduce costs
• Knowing the problems involved when a deal is under ripe versus overripe
• Identifying key contract provisions to be including in any IT service agreement:
• Disclaimers, conditions, and exclusions
• Representations and warranties
• Limitation of liability caps
• Consequential
• Discussing and agreeing to restrictions on damages
• Managing contentious negotiations over the circumstances that can trigger unlimited liability under the exceptions to indemnity obligations
• Breach of IP
• Breach of confidentiality
• Gross negligence conduct
• Functionality of the software product in a virtual environment
• Ensuring provenance of the code through specific terms pertaining
to software ownership
• Developing a formula for determining appropriate representations and warranties based on the extent to which open source code is used
• Detecting when it makes sense to obtain cybersecurity insurance rather than obtaining warranties
• Resolving the conflicting business and financial interests between the vendor and customer
• Distinguishing how negotiations are evolving as we move away from perpetual license models to subscription-based pricing models
• Classifying when concessions can be made with subscription- based licenses
• Comprehending a vendor’s profit margins with respect to perpetual license models and subscription-based license models to assess driving motivating factors in negotiations
• Determining when standardized agreements can be negotiated

12:30
Networking Luncheon
1:30
Breaking Up is Hard to Do: The Importance of Having a Well-Defined Exit Strategy

Mark Grossman
Counsel
Tannenbaum Helpern Syracuse & Hirschtritt (New York, NY)

Mark Grech
General Counsel
MATRIXX Software, Inc. (Mountain View, CA)

Rebecca Hamilton Gahete
Deputy General Counsel and Director, Information Management
JM Family Enterprises, Inc. (Deerfield Beach, FL)

• The importance for each party of having a clear exit strategy 
— Understanding the mechanics and consequences of early termination

 What are your rights and remedies when the other party stops cooperating?
 What types of breaches should trigger termination?
 Knowledge transfer from the vendor (making sure key resources are available after termination for a period of time) 
 Has the vendor created project artifacts (install guides, architecture diagrams, etc.) that the customer will need?
 How to make sure that SLAs in the agreement can actually help you with termination leverage?
 Non-solicitation issues (in case the customer may need to poach talent from the vendor)
 Termination for convenience
 When is it appropriate?
 Costs and consequences
 Intentional Breach Scenarios
 Business justifications
 Consequences
• Are you adequately protected by your contract’s “end-of-life” provisions?
 Data migration and other post-contract assistance
 Post-termination data access:
 How long will my provider store my data after the contract is terminated and is this affected by the type of termination (e.g., non-payment vs. vendor’s uncured breach)?
 What is a meaningful process and time frame for retrieving my data after termination?
 Impact of privacy and export laws on a customer’s ability to retrieve data.
• What happens if the vendor ceases to exist:
 Bankruptcy considerations
 Merger or acquisition
 Understanding when the vendor officially still “exists,” but has ceased operations or its operations are seriously or fundamentally impaired
 Is your agreement consistent with your obligations to your customers and liabilities under applicable laws (e.g., HIPAA, Gramm-Leach-Bliley (GLB) Act)?
 Source code escrow
 Release conditions
 Viability of this alternative
• Exploring how to change vendors without sacrificing continuity of service
 Formulating strategies to transfer data while minimizing the risk of data breaches or loss of data
 Understanding how to move back to an on-premises solution from the cloud

2:45
Afternoon Refreshment Break
3:00
Ensuring the Continuity of Business Operations to Raise Profits and Curtail Interruptions in Service

Ian G. DiBernardo
Partner
Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP (New York, NY)

Sidney Gottesman
Executive Vice President, Business Information Officer
MasterCard Worldwide (Purchase, NY)

Rebecca Hamilton Gahete
Deputy General Counsel and Director, Information Management
JM Family Enterprises, Inc. (Deerfield Beach, FL)

• Incorporating key provisions in the agreement regarding:

 Payment structure
 Acceptance testing
 Service level agreements
 Dispute resolution and liquidated damages
 Personnel assigned to perform services, including terms and conditions for background checks
 Bug fixes, upgrades, and new versions of the product
 Remote access agreements
 Security and protection of information
• Factoring the interplay of timing on acceptance, warranty, and start of support into the agreement
• Minimizing ambiguity by negotiating warranty provisions from the outset to address:
 Remedies, repair, and replacement
 Cost of replacement products, including returns and refunds
 Virus warranties and remedies
• Defining the parameters for support of the product
• Establishing the methods of delivery and hours of availability for support
• Formulating the plan for renewals and extensions of the licenses
• Identifying vendor versus customer responsibilities
• Exploring alternatives to software escrow agreements
• Understanding the basic elements of revenue recognition and comprehending its impact on information technology licensing and agreements
 Distinguishing the basic elements of revenue recognition
 Formulating revenue recognition as it applies to common licensing models
 Balancing a vendor’s revenue recognition objectives and the customer’s need for certainty and vendor accountability

4:00
Examining Data Ownership in Light of the Advances in Technological Innovation: Evolving Data and Smart Applications

Kimberly Cilke
Assistant General Counsel
GoDaddy Operating Company, LLC (Scottsdale, AZ)

Daniel Pepper
Assistant General Counsel
Verizon Communications, Inc. (Basking Ridge, NJ)

The amount of data stored, analyzed, and collected is proliferating at a rapid speed as the world becomes more and more connected through social media, smart cars, smart homes, smart health, wearable devices and more. Mobile devices are also driving advances in technology at an unparalleled pace. As companies increasingly turn to open source, the cloud, and big data analytics to develop pioneering technologies, the idea of who owns the data becomes progressively more difficult to characterize. Points of discussion shall include:

• Understanding the trend of escalation in open source software and the cloud
• Calculating the issues to consider when negotiating a commercial agreements
 Assigning ownership of data in the agreement
 Incorporating ownership of data when a relationship terminates in the agreement
 Can you sublicense data?
 Can you make representations of the data itself?
• Exploring data and considering whether to purchase or license
 Entering into a contract with a cloud vendor engaging in big data analytics
 Determining liability in the event of federal agency enforcement action
• Governing the limitations of use on data
• Establishing data ownership in connection with cutting-edge technology
 Identifying the parties involved with potential ownership claims to the data
• Evaluating unique IP considerations and infringement issues with new forms of technology: comprehending where you can get into trouble
• Examining the relationship between privacy and consumer protection laws with data ownership

5:00
Conference Adjourns

Day 3 - Wednesday, November 19, 2014

9:00
Live Mock Negotiation: Strategies for Avoiding Common Stumbling Blocks

Jae Pak
Senior Attorney, Cloud + Enterprise
Microsoft Corporation (Redmond, WA)

Wendy Kearns
Partner
Davis Wright Tremaine LLP (Seattle, WA)

Jasbir Kaur Khalsa CIPP/US
Attorney
Microsoft Corporation

Your company wants to use a new high-tech, high value software but negotiating the agreement has not been easy. During this session, witness as experienced negotiators demonstrate how to overcome common stumbling blocks. Take note as you are placed in the room with both parties as they guide you through an in-depth discussion of how to best work through a potentially explosive situation over implementation of the agreements. This workshop will help prepare CIOs, CTOs, attorneys, licensing and contract professionals, and IT managers for negotiating a successful licensing agreement. Points of illustration shall include:

• Understanding current standards and what is considered reasonable and enforceable contractually
• Determining whether to resolve big issues or small issues first
• Formulating creative strategies as leverage to ensure stable service
• Identifying how to move past the sticking points in order to continue the negotiation
• Knowing when to walk away from the deal

9:00 am – 12:00 pm (Registration begins at 8:15 am)