Second National Forum on

Corporate Compliance with The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act

Thursday, January 29, 2004

About

Dear Colleague,

On September 8, 2003, the Supreme Court of the United States - in its first summer sitting since the Watergate tapes case in August of 1974 - heard final arguments on the constitutionality of The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002.

When its decision is handed down in mid-December - just in time for the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary - the fate of hundreds of millions of dollars in campaign contributions will come into play. Will there be a ban on soft money? What will become of the restrictions on issue advocacy? Or the new rules for raising money at the state and local levels? What about the new liability risks for candidates, officeholders and donors? In short, how will American corporations be permitted to effectively participate in the political process?

To guide you through this challenging court decision and the implications of the legislation, American Conference Institute has assembled an outstanding faculty of top legal and political professionals who will provide you with all the information you need to plan your corporate political strategy under the new rules. They will offer you insights on the most important issues including:
  • How the Supreme Court's ruling on campaign finance reform impacts American corporations
  • The impact of the Supreme Court's interpretation of the BCRA on major American lobbying organizations
  • What candidates and corporate donors must look out for in the implementation and enforcement of campaign finance laws
  • How corporations can use issue advocacy to full advantage
  • Issue advertising and permissible corporate speech for American corporations
  • And much, much more . . .

Contents & Contributors

About

Dear Colleague,

On September 8, 2003, the Supreme Court of the United States - in its first summer sitting since the Watergate tapes case in August of 1974 - heard final arguments on the constitutionality of The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002.

When its decision is handed down in mid-December - just in time for the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary - the fate of hundreds of millions of dollars in campaign contributions will come into play. Will there be a ban on soft money? What will become of the restrictions on issue advocacy? Or the new rules for raising money at the state and local levels? What about the new liability risks for candidates, officeholders and donors? In short, how will American corporations be permitted to effectively participate in the political process?

To guide you through this challenging court decision and the implications of the legislation, American Conference Institute has assembled an outstanding faculty of top legal and political professionals who will provide you with all the information you need to plan your corporate political strategy under the new rules. They will offer you insights on the most important issues including:
  • How the Supreme Court's ruling on campaign finance reform impacts American corporations
  • The impact of the Supreme Court's interpretation of the BCRA on major American lobbying organizations
  • What candidates and corporate donors must look out for in the implementation and enforcement of campaign finance laws
  • How corporations can use issue advocacy to full advantage
  • Issue advertising and permissible corporate speech for American corporations
  • And much, much more . . .

Contents & Contributors

FINANCING PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATING CONVENTIONS: CORPORATE AND INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY
Joseph E. Sandler, Sandler, Reiff & Yong, P.C.
Cindy M. Lott, 2004 Democratic National Convention

MCCONNELL AND ISSUE ADVOCACY
Frances R. Hill, University of Miami School of Law

FEDERAL PROSECUTION OF ELECTION OFFENSES
Craig C. Donsanto, U.S. Department of Justice
Nancy L. Simmons, U.S. Department of Justice

POLITICAL LAW & LOBBYING GUIDE
Kirk L. Jowers, Caplin & Drysdale
Lloyd H. Mayer, Caplin & Drysdale

CAMPAIGNS & ELECTIONS
Stephen A. Bokat, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Lee E. Goodman, Wiley, Rein & Fielding LLP

GENERAL OUTLINE DESCRIBING CAMPAIGN FINANCE, LOBBYING AND GIFT LAWS
Ki P. Hong, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

RESTRICTIONS ON FEDERAL CONTRIBUTIONS UNDER THE FECA AND FEC REGULATIONS
Ki P. Hong, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

SUMMARY OF THE BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT AND IMPACT OF SUPREME COURT DECISION IN MCCONNELL V. FEC
Ki P. Hong, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

SURVEY OF STATE CONTRIBUTION LAWS
Ki P. Hong, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

FEDERAL LOBBYING LAW THE LOBBYING DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1995
Ki P. Hong, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

THE U.S. SENATE AND HOUSE GIFT RULES
Ki P. Hong, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

COMPLIANCE PROGRAM FOR CAMPAIGN FINANCE LAW
Ki P. Hong, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

COMPLIANCE PROGRAM FOR THE GIFT AND GRATUITY LAWS
Ki P. Hong, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

COMPLIANCE PROGRAM FOR LOBBY REGISTRATION AND REPORTING LAWS
Ki P. Hong, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

FEDERAL EXECUTIVE BRANCH GIFT RULES
Ki P. Hong, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP



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