Corporate Compliance with

The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act

Comprehensive Guide to the New Legislation * Strategies for Successful Implementation * Avoiding Corporate Liability

Monday, June 23, 2003

About

The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 ("BCRA") accomplishes the most sweeping change in the regulation of election financing since enactment of the Federal Election Campaign Act amendments in 1974, passed in the wake of the Watergate scandal. The BCRA is complex and compliance poses a challenge for corporations, unions and lobbyists.

With a major constitutional challenge underway, it is not yet completely clear what the ultimate impact of the legislation will be. The ban on soft money, the restrictions on issue advocacy, the new rules for raising money at the state and local level and the new liability risks for candidates, officeholders and donors will quickly alter the American political landscape. Are you fully prepared for these changes?

To guide you through this challenging environment, the American Conference Institute assembled an outstanding faculty of top legal and political professionals who will provide you with all the information you need to plan your corporate political strategy under the new rules. They offered their insights on the most important issues including:
  • What every American corporation needs to know about the BCRA
  • How to devise an effective corporate political speech and communication strategy under the BCRA
  • The new liabilities of federal candidates, officeholders and donors for violating the BCRA
  • Navigating the restrictions on fundraising activities at the state and local level
  • The FEC's perspective on union and corporate fundraising
  • And much, much more…
This is a new era for making political donations. It requires new information, new approaches, new strategies. Yesterday's knowledge is not enough to make the right decisions in today's political climate.

Contents & Contributors

About

The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 ("BCRA") accomplishes the most sweeping change in the regulation of election financing since enactment of the Federal Election Campaign Act amendments in 1974, passed in the wake of the Watergate scandal. The BCRA is complex and compliance poses a challenge for corporations, unions and lobbyists.

With a major constitutional challenge underway, it is not yet completely clear what the ultimate impact of the legislation will be. The ban on soft money, the restrictions on issue advocacy, the new rules for raising money at the state and local level and the new liability risks for candidates, officeholders and donors will quickly alter the American political landscape. Are you fully prepared for these changes?

To guide you through this challenging environment, the American Conference Institute assembled an outstanding faculty of top legal and political professionals who will provide you with all the information you need to plan your corporate political strategy under the new rules. They offered their insights on the most important issues including:
  • What every American corporation needs to know about the BCRA
  • How to devise an effective corporate political speech and communication strategy under the BCRA
  • The new liabilities of federal candidates, officeholders and donors for violating the BCRA
  • Navigating the restrictions on fundraising activities at the state and local level
  • The FEC's perspective on union and corporate fundraising
  • And much, much more…
This is a new era for making political donations. It requires new information, new approaches, new strategies. Yesterday's knowledge is not enough to make the right decisions in today's political climate.

Contents & Contributors

RESPONSE TO VOTING WITH DOLLARS: A NEW PARADIGM FOR CAMPAIGN FINANCE
Fred Wertheimer, Democracy 21
Alexandra T.V. Edsall, Democracy 21

BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002: SUMMARY OUTLINE
Joseph Sandler, Sandler, Reiff & Young, P.C.
Neil Reiff, Sandler, Reiff & Young, P.C.

THE McCONNELL V. FEC CAMPAIGN FINANCE DECISION – A SUMMARY
Submitted by Jan Witold Baran, Wiley Rein & Fielding LLP

BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002
Submitted by Jan Witold Baran, Wiley Rein & Fielding LLP

SENTENCING GUIDELINES IMPOSE TOUGH NEW CRIMINAL PENALTIES
Submitted by Jan Witold Baran, Wiley Rein & Fielding LLP

NEW DISCLAIMERS FOR PAC PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS, PUBLIC EMAILS AND PUBLIC WEBSITES
Submitted by Jan Witold Baran, Wiley Rein & Fielding LLP

THE NEW IRC § 527 LAW
Submitted by Jan Witold Baran, Wiley Rein & Fielding LLP

SUMMARY OF ARGUMENTS IN SUPPORT OF THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF THE BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002: APPELLANT-INTERVENORS' JURISDICTIONAL STATEMENT FILED WITH THE U.S. SUPREME COURT ON MAY 5, 2003
Randolph D. Moss, Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering
Trevor Potter, Campaign Legal Center

WHAT EVERY CORPORATION AND TRADE ASSOCIATION NEEDS TO KNOW IN THE BRAVE NEW WORLD OF CAMPAIGN FINANCE REFORM
Benjamin L. Ginsberg, Patton Boggs LLP

THE BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002: PROVISIONS RELATING TO CORPORATE ACTIVITIES
Neil P. Reiff, Sandler, Reiff & Young, P.C.

LEGAL RULES GOVERNING CORPORATE POLITICAL ACTIVITY
Lee E. Goodman, Wiley, Rein & Fielding LLP

ISSUE AND EXPRESS ADVOCACY
Trevor Potter, Caplin & Drysdale
Kirk L. Jowers, Caplin & Drysdale

IN THE LINE OF FIRE: LIABILITY OF FEDERAL CANDIDATES AND OFFICEHOLDERS UNDER THE BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002
Robert F. Bauer, Perkins Coie

NAVIGATING THE RESTRICTIONS ON STATE AND LOCAL PARTIES
Bobby R. Burchfield, Covington & Burling

BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002 AND STATE AND LOCAL POLITICAL PARTIES
Glen Shor, The Campaign Legal Center

REMARKS OF COMMISSIONER SCOTT E. THOMAS
Scott E. Thomas, Federal Election Commission

THE BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT
Kenneth A. Gross, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP


DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0