Law Firm Diversity

Monday, March 27, 2006

About

Is Your Firm Doing All It Can – And Should – To Achieve and Maintain The Standard of Diversity Corporate America is Looking For?

America's top corporations are increasingly demanding that the firms they pick to do business with show evidence of embracing diversity. Since 1999, when the first statement asking for increased diversity in the legal profession was issued, corporations have issued further calls for law firms to take steps to better reflect the clients they serve, most notably the "Call to Action" issued in 2004. Most recently, in May, 2005, more than 60 law firms made a pact agreeing to tell their corporate clients the make-up of their legal teams by criteria including race and gender.

Failing to live up to corporate diversity requirements can mean the difference between gaining or retaining business, or losing it to those firms that do successfully recruit and retain diverse candidates. But what do you need to do to ensure you are one of the firms of choice for corporate America?

Most firms have taken at least some steps to start a diversity initiative. But it can be a tough process, not only to implement initially, but to maintain. What are the best ways to proceed? How do you tap into sources of the candidates you need? What practical steps can you take to make sure that your plan is more than a policy statement from your HR department? What steps will get your firm beyond holding diversity retreats – and into increased partnership for diversity candidates? What does it take to make your diversity initiative a seamless – and successful – part of your law firm culture?

Get the answers to these questions and more from American Conference Institute's publication on Achieving, Managing and Maintaining Law Firm Diversity. This publication will provide you with cutting-edge, practical information on:

  • Developing mentorship and affinity programs that promote a culture of diversity – and lead to promotions for associates from all backgrounds
  • Using metrics to measure the effectiveness of your efforts
  • Developing a recruitment strategy that helps you attract lateral hires and become a magnet for promising candidates

Contents & Contributors

About

Is Your Firm Doing All It Can – And Should – To Achieve and Maintain The Standard of Diversity Corporate America is Looking For?

America's top corporations are increasingly demanding that the firms they pick to do business with show evidence of embracing diversity. Since 1999, when the first statement asking for increased diversity in the legal profession was issued, corporations have issued further calls for law firms to take steps to better reflect the clients they serve, most notably the "Call to Action" issued in 2004. Most recently, in May, 2005, more than 60 law firms made a pact agreeing to tell their corporate clients the make-up of their legal teams by criteria including race and gender.

Failing to live up to corporate diversity requirements can mean the difference between gaining or retaining business, or losing it to those firms that do successfully recruit and retain diverse candidates. But what do you need to do to ensure you are one of the firms of choice for corporate America?

Most firms have taken at least some steps to start a diversity initiative. But it can be a tough process, not only to implement initially, but to maintain. What are the best ways to proceed? How do you tap into sources of the candidates you need? What practical steps can you take to make sure that your plan is more than a policy statement from your HR department? What steps will get your firm beyond holding diversity retreats – and into increased partnership for diversity candidates? What does it take to make your diversity initiative a seamless – and successful – part of your law firm culture?

Get the answers to these questions and more from American Conference Institute's publication on Achieving, Managing and Maintaining Law Firm Diversity. This publication will provide you with cutting-edge, practical information on:

  • Developing mentorship and affinity programs that promote a culture of diversity – and lead to promotions for associates from all backgrounds
  • Using metrics to measure the effectiveness of your efforts
  • Developing a recruitment strategy that helps you attract lateral hires and become a magnet for promising candidates

Contents & Contributors


DIVERSITY ▪ INITIATIVE 2006
Carl G. Cooper, Kirkpatrick & Lockhart Nicholson Graham LLP

PARTNERING FOR PROGRESS
James A. Klenk, Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP
Stephen H. Pugh, Pugh, Jones, Johnson & Quandt

USING CONSORTIUMS, ALLIANCES AND INTER-FIRM PARTNERSHIPS TO RECRUIT AND RETAIN DIVERSE CANDIDATES
Jesse H. Ruiz, Gardner Carton & Douglas LLP

MENTORSHIP PROGRAMS THAT CREATE A CULTURE OF INCLUSION TO HELP RETAIN YOUR BEST PERFORMERS
Byron W. Cooper, Townsend and Townsend and Crew LLP

PROMOTING DIFFERENCES: ACHIEVING A MORE DIVERSE PARTNERSHIP
Michael W. Oshima, Arnold & Porter LLP

DIVERSITY TRAINING TO FACILITATE FIRM-WIDE BUY-IN
Erica Bronstein, Ibis Consulting Group Inc.
Jacqueline Wilson Cranford, O'Melveny & Myers LLP

SETTING UP EFFECTIVE AFFINITY PROGRAMS THAT DELIVER RESULTS
Deborah E. Barnard, Holland & Knight LLP

MEASURING YOUR PROGRESS: ESTABLISHING METRICS TO DETERMINE DIVERSITY INITIATIVE SUCCESS, FAILURES, AND AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT
Mauricio Velásquez, The Diversity Training Group

CONDUCTING A SELF-ASSESSING OF YOUR FIRM'S DIVERSITY PRACTICE
Mauricio Velásquez, The Diversity Training Group
Helise Harrington, Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP



DOCUMENT TYPES: PRESENTATIONS AVAILABLE: 0