Talent Succession in Oil & Gas

Overcoming the Workforce Deficit in Oil and Gas with Innovative Strategies to Recruit, Retain and Develop New Talent

Thursday, May 29, 2008

About

According to several published studies, the average oil and gas employee is now approximately 50 years old. With most baby boomers retiring in the next 5-15 years, how are oil and gas companies equipped to handle rapidly growing energy demands with a decreasing workforce?

Extensive layoffs, mergers and acquisitions in the 1980’s and 1990’s, and the general reputation of oil and gas as unprogressive have contributed to Gen-X and Gen-Y workers shying away from the industry. Grasping the seriousness of the labor shortage, many universities and companies have begun to work together to actively recruiting a younger workforce. Initiating internship and mentoring programs at and between universities and industry, employing innovative recruitment and retention practices, and providing in-depth technical training are some of the significant steps that this industry is taking to overcome the critical talent issue.

This publication from ACI's inaugural Talent Succession in Oil & Gas Summit offers information the best practices for recruiting and retaining employees, the importance of technical and safety training and knowledge transfer, and how to integrate the work styles of Gen-X and Gen-Y with that of baby boomers.

Contents & Contributors

About

According to several published studies, the average oil and gas employee is now approximately 50 years old. With most baby boomers retiring in the next 5-15 years, how are oil and gas companies equipped to handle rapidly growing energy demands with a decreasing workforce?

Extensive layoffs, mergers and acquisitions in the 1980’s and 1990’s, and the general reputation of oil and gas as unprogressive have contributed to Gen-X and Gen-Y workers shying away from the industry. Grasping the seriousness of the labor shortage, many universities and companies have begun to work together to actively recruiting a younger workforce. Initiating internship and mentoring programs at and between universities and industry, employing innovative recruitment and retention practices, and providing in-depth technical training are some of the significant steps that this industry is taking to overcome the critical talent issue.

This publication from ACI's inaugural Talent Succession in Oil & Gas Summit offers information the best practices for recruiting and retaining employees, the importance of technical and safety training and knowledge transfer, and how to integrate the work styles of Gen-X and Gen-Y with that of baby boomers.

Contents & Contributors

THE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA
Steve Long, University of Oklahoma

THROWING A BIG NET – ENGAGING LARGE NUMBERS OF HIGH- ACHIEVING MINORITY STUDENTS
Doug Ratcliff, University of Texas at Austin

COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENTAL ENERGY PROGRAM AT FORT VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY
Isaac J. Crumbly, Ph.D., Fort Valley State University

API’S EFFORTS: EXPANDING THE TALENT PIPELINE
Denise McCourt, American Petroleum Institute

INSTITUTING EFFECTIVE CROSS TRAINING, PROMOTION AND RETENTION PRACTICES
Mark Viator, Partnership Strategies, LLC

RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION
Forrest Bjerkaas, Shell

LAND RECRUITING METHODS
Henry Hood, Chesapeake Energy

CASE STUDY: CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR O & G AT MIDLAND COLLEGE
Hoxie Smith, Midland College



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